2019 Beacon Awards in association with NZME. - Key Dates

Posted 10 October 2018.

Key Dates for the 2019 Beacon Awards in association with NZME:

Call for Entry opens: Tuesday 4 December 2018

Entries close: Tuesday 26 February 2019 at 4pm

48hr deadline closes: Thursday 28 February 2019 at 4pm

Entry Writing Workshop: Thursday 31 January, 9 - 11am - TBC

Media Business of the Year entries open: Tuesday 4 December 2018

Media Business of the Year entries close: Tuesday 26 March 2019 at 4pm

Sales Person or Team of the Year entries open: Tuesday 4 December 2018

Sales Person or Team of the Year entries close: Tuesday 26 March 2019 at 4pm

Rising Star entries open: Tuesday 4 December 2018

Rising Star entries close: Tuesday 26 March 2019 at 4pm

Sandy Smith Nominations open: Tuesday 4 December 2018

Sandy Smith Nominations close: Tuesday 26 March 2019 at 4pm

Media Agency of the Year entries open: Thursday 28 February 2019

Media Agency of the Year entries close: Thursday 4 April 2019 at 4pm

Campaign material due (finalists only): Tuesday 9 April 2019

Beacon Awards Show: Thursday 16 May 2019 at Shed 10

WIN a Glamping Getaway with TRB at the Effie Awards

Posted 10 October 2018.

​To celebrate the gurus of the advertising and marketing industry at the 2018 Effie Awards, The Radio Bureau is giving two lucky souls the chance to win one of two Glamping Getaways.

​Listen to all four audio clips featuring ‘Words of Wisdom” voiced by NZ radio talent. Guess who voiced each clip and be in to win!

ENTER NOW

Please note: winners will be announced at the 2018 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ, so you must have a ticket if you enter the competition.

Axis Executive Team 2019

Posted 2 October 2018.

​Meet the team behind Axis 2019

SHANE BRADNICK - CONVENOR

Executive Creative Director

DDB

Shane has worked in advertising for more than 20 years. Starting as an Art Director at DDB and then TBWA South Africa before immigrating to Australia to join M&C Saatchi Sydney, and then Australian Agency of the Decade, BMF. In 2013 a move to New Zealand saw him back at DDB, where he’s now currently the Executive Creative Director in Auckland.

Shane has been lucky enough to work with some of the best brands in the world. Internationally and locally he has created some famous and effective work for McDonald’s, Speight’s, Steinlager, Lotto NZ, BMW & Mini, Cadbury, SKY TV, Westpac and many more.

Shane has won over 200 awards at international and local shows, including Cannes, D&AD, Spikes, One Show, AWARD and AXIS. He has also been named one of the best Art Directors and Executive Creative Directors in the world by The WON Report and is consistently a Campaign Brief Top 3 ECD.

Outside of advertising, Shane lives a rather quiet life with his very patient wife, less than patient two sons and an orange bitey cat named Steve.

PAUL WILSON - CHAIR

Managing Director

Saatchi & Saatchi

Paul Wilson is Managing Director of Saatchi & Saatchi New Zealand. He joined the agency in early 2013 form Colenso BBDO and quickly helped bring the agency creative success, through his leadership of the team that created Tui ‘Beer Plumber’ and later Tui ‘Catch a Million’. As well as a passionate focus on creating great creative work, Paul brings strong business leadership skills and deep experience across the Automotive, FMCG, QSR and Financial services sectors.

Throughout his 20-year career, Paul has worked at some of NZ’s best agencies and developed a body of work that has won numerous Cannes Lions, D&AD pencils as well as many local creative and effectiveness awards.

In his spare time, Paul also manages an unusually large collection of sneakers alongside spending time with his wife Van and two kids.

BRIGID ALKEMA - Jury President

Executive Creative Director

Clemenger BBDO Wellington

Brigid first found herself at Clemenger BBDO Wellington back in 2000. After a stint in Sydney Australia, first at DDB and then at Clemenger, she returned to her beloved hometown and, and of course, her beloved agency. After consistently being ranked as one of Australasia’s top creatives, she became Clemenger BBDO’s Executive Creative Director in 2015. Since then, WARC100 has ranked the agency in the Top 25 globally.

Brigid loves leading a team that are passionate about connecting with Kiwis, and making stuff that matters and contributes to culture. Pushing the boundaries of what many thought possible for social change programmes, Brigid and her team have generated some of the most memorable and effective work in New Zealand.

Brigid has been a jury member at Cannes, D&AD, The One Show, New York Festivals, Spikes, Webbys, AdStars, AWARD and Axis, and has been highly awarded at every major award show. Campaign Brief ‘The Work’ and Best Ads have had her ranked as one of the top 5 creative directors in Australasia for the last five years.

JONNY KOFOED - Jury President

Director of Motion & Design

Assembly

Jonny Kofoed is one of the founding partners of Assembly in Auckland, New Zealand.

His work spans film, animation, design, interactive and visual effects projects, and alongside traditional advertising, he has created lighting installations, directed music videos, designed games, film titles and an iPhone app that can be used while wearing boxing gloves.

SInce Assembly opened its doors eight years ago, Jonny and his company have been recognized consistently at award shows — collecting yellow pencils at D&AD and multiple Gold Lions at Cannes along the way. Jonny is a regular on juries locally and internationally, and loves the judging process — especially when it involves a fierce debate and those little club sandwich things.

AARON TURK - Jury President

Creative Director

Little Giant

Aaron is Creative Director at Little Giant. Before joining Little Giant Aaron spent almost 10 years helping drive Colenso BBDO’s approach to digital and it’s influence on the work, 7 years at Tribal DDB guiding brands through the Dot-com boom and 5 years at Terabyte Interactive before the internet even existed.

He considers himself very lucky to have worked with some incredibly talented people over the years creating platforms, products, apps, and campaigns for brands such as Pedigree, Anchor, Gatorade, Air New Zealand, Nike, V Energy, Volkswagen, and Samsung.

Aaron has done his fair share of judging including Cannes Cyber Lions in 2007 & 2014 and has picked up the odd piece of metal at Cannes, Spikes, DMA’s, Caples and Echos.

If he’s not at home entertaining his kids he’s probably on a river in the middle of nowhere.

REGAN GRAFTON - Jury President

Chief Creative Officer

Ogilvy

Regan is the Chief Creative Officer at Ogilvy New Zealand. Previously, he worked as the ECD of FCB NZ and as Creative Director at DDB New Zealand. Regan has been instrumental in many agency successes, and was a key part in winning Campaign Brief Creative Agency of the year 7 times. Most recently he has won FCB’s first Campaign Brief Creative Agency of the year title. As well as numerous other industry number one titles including Young Guns Global Agency of the Year, Spikes Network of the Year and NBR Agency of the Year.

On a personal level, Regan has been ranked number six in the world (2014 Won Report), number one in NZ (Campaign Brief NZ 2014-15), has 36 Cannes lions to his name. Along with other countless international Grand prix, golds, silvers and bronzes from numerous international and local shows.

Regan is also ranked very highly at his local A&E as his passion for DIY has put him on a first name basis there.

2018 Finalists Announced for The Effie Awards in Association with TVNZ!

Posted 27 September 2018.

​The biggest night on the New Zealand advertising industry calendar is fast approaching, with finalists in the 2087 NZ Effie Awards announced today.

Organised by the Commercial Communications Council with key partner TVNZ, the 2018 NZ Effie Awards will be presented at a glittering ceremony at Shed 10, Queens Wharf, Auckland on October 18th

This year Effies is bringing attention to long term success; campaigns that have gone beyond short term returns and created genuine lasting change for an organisation. As part of this, the eligible entry dates for Effies has been extended backwards in order to create a more open window of eligibility for these long-term success stories. The intention of these new dates is to allow long term campaigns from the last 2 years an opportunity to demonstrate their success across a longer period of time than previously available.

A panel of 180 expert industry judges in Auckland and Wellington assessed entries in two rounds to select just under 100 finalists across 17 categories. (See finalist list attached). Selections have also been made for the paper that deserves title of ‘The Hardest Challenge’ which will be announced on awards evening.

All Gold Effie category winners will also be eligible for the Grand Effie®, which is awarded to the campaign that achieved the most extraordinary commercial result for its client. The winner will also receive $100,000 in TVNZ airtime, thanks to sponsor TVNZ*.

This year’s executive judging panel includes Mark Earles, aka the HERDmeister. Mark is a leading-edge thinker in behavioural and decision science who challenges much of the received wisdom about human behaviour. He will also be delivering a keynote address at the Annual Effectiveness Function on the 11th October.

Tickets for the 2018 NZ Effie Awards, in association with TVNZ, can be booked through Eventfinda here.

Comms Council also thank commercial partner NZME, and sponsors Nielsen, Bauer, Google, The Radio Bureau, Adshel and SOAR Print for making the 2018 Effie Awards possible.

For more information, please contact:

Natasha Galloway, Sponsorship and Events Director

P: 09 303 0435

E: natasha@commscouncil.nz

* Terms and conditions apply

Ticket sales for the 2018 NZ Effie Awards Gala Dinner now open

Building Diverse & Inclusive Agencies - a step in the right direction

Posted 25 September 2018.

​On Wednesday 19th September, the Comms Council in partnership with Diversity Works New Zealand hosted a breakfast speaker event, Building Diverse & Inclusive Agencies: Beyond the Buzzwords and into Best Practice.

Over 60 agency representatives were in attendance, which demonstrates that the industry is eager to pursue best practice in diversity and inclusion.

Rachel Hopkins, CEO, Diversity Works New Zealand opened the event with a nod to the suffragettes on the 125th Anniversary of NZ women winning the right to vote. She also shared that diversity is becoming more important in the workplace than ever before in terms of the creative and commercial impact that it has on businesses.

Charlotte Downes, Diversity & Inclusion Manager, Air New Zealand focused on gender diversity and the progress that Air New Zealand has made in this area. She touched on the systemic policy changes that need to be made for an organisation to be truly inclusive.

Mark Carrick, Diversity & Inclusion Lead, Bank of New Zealand shared their philosophy on diversity as multi-faceted, going beyond gender or ethnicity alone and looking at all the influences that make up a person’s identity. He also highlighted some hidden challenges and considerations that businesses may face as they become more diverse and inclusive.

Jim Moser, CEO, Clemenger Group shared the journey that they have been on towards diversity and inclusion. He outlined few practical examples of targets and goals that Clemenger have established and the progress they’ve made towards them. Jim also named a few organisations and qualifications that agencies can partner with to help them in the process.

Paul Head, CEO Comms Council closed the event with a call to arms and a reminder that the Comms Council have a mandate for all member agencies to put an Inclusiveness & Diversity Policy in place by the end of 2018.

Attendees walked away with practical tips and tools to take back and implement in their agencies.

About the PREScom Awards

Posted 21 September 2018.

​Read the Call For Entries Documentation - DOWNLOAD HERE

Click here for more information on the categories

​What are the PREScom Awards all about?

The Communication Council’s PR, Experiential and Social Media Committee (PREScom) was established in 2008 to raise awareness of the value of PR, Experiential and Social Media services for clients.

As part of its drive to promote best practice in these industries, PREScom is launching an awards programme and event with the goal of bringing the industry and clients together to recognise and celebrate the best work in New Zealand.

The inaugural PREScom Awards 2018 is your opportunity to showcase your achievements in PR, Experiential and Social Media throughout 2017 and 2018. The awards will highlight the most effective campaigns in their categories and fields, showing exceptional results for clients and their brands.

The Awards will be overseen and judged by a jury panel of industry experts working on leading global brands and the best agencies in the country.

Why you should enter the PREScom Awards

- Prove that you are the best in the industry

- Motivate your team

- Gain new business

- Impress and showcase your clients

- Recruit amazing new talent and retain your best

- Beat your competition

- Attend the networking and celebration event of the year!

- Showcase the power of PR, Experiential and Social Media

The PREScom Awards are open to all NZ-based agencies and in-house communication teams, both Comms Council members and non-members.

Click here for more information about entering the 2018 PREScom Awards

Call for Entries - 2018 PREScom Awards

Posted 21 September 2018.

Read the Call For Entries Documentation - DOWNLOAD HERE

To enter, email your completed entry and cover page to awards@commscouncil.nz

Entries Close - Wednesday 24th October / Late entry deadline - Friday 26th October

Categories & Entry Forms

*Please note that to enter you must email both your entry form and cover page to awards@commscouncil.nz

A. Best Use of Media Relations

This category recognises entries that deliver outstanding earned media coverage. The entry will demonstrate thinking beyond the standard media release; it will show how powerful storytelling and strong content delivered exceptional results in a competitive and cluttered market. Judges will need to understand the challenge and context, and will be looking for a clear strategy, the ‘hook’ and effective execution that resulted in outstanding media coverage.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form A - Best Use of Media Relations

B. Best Sponsorship or Media Partnership

This category rewards remarkable integrated PR, Experiential and/or Social campaigns that use media partnerships or sponsorships of events, content or charities to drive awareness and/or engagement. The sponsorship or partnership should be a core component of the campaign, and demonstrate how it was critical to success of the overall campaign.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form B - Best Sponsorship or Media Partnership

C. Best Public Affairs or Stakeholder Management Campaign

This category recognises outstanding public affairs or stakeholder management campaigns. Focusing on government relations, media communications, issues management, social responsibility or a combination. Your campaign must influence public policy, build and maintain a strong reputation and/or manage stakeholders. Judges will be looking for clever use of insights and research, along with evidence of how and why stakeholders were successfully influenced.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form C - Best Public Affairs or Stakeholder Management Campaign

D. Best Use of Social Media

This category recognises entries that deliver outstanding social media campaigns. We want to know how you brought all the pieces together to drive exceptional results. Judges will be looking for evidence of what the business challenge was and how you approached it with insights and social media strategy. Judges will look for creativity, innovation, sound communication and, of course, data and metrics, showing how your campaign measured up against objectives.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form D - Best Use of Social Media

E. Best Influencer Marketing Campaign

This category recognises entries that deliver outstanding influencer marketing campaigns. We want to know how you utilised social media influencers for the good of your brand and drove results, not just ‘likes’. Judges will be looking for evidence of what the business challenge was and how you approached it using insights - right from content creative, channel planning and influencer selection. Judges will look for influencer + brand alignment, creativity, innovation, sound communication and, of course, data and metrics, showing how your campaign measured up against objectives.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form E - Best Influencer Marketing Campaign

F. Best Experiential or Event Campaign

This category recognises entries that deliver outstanding experiential campaigns via live events, pop-ups, expos, product launches or large and small-scale publicity stunts and experiential campaigns. The campaign will be physical in its core but can have virtual elements around it. Judges will be looking for evidence that the experience was the central component of the campaign, rather than campaigns with an experiential/event component. They will also need to understand how the campaign integrated into the wider marketing strategy and how it was leveraged to deliver outstanding campaign results.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form F - Best Experiential or Event Campaign

G. Best Sampling or Retail Activation

This category recognises entries that deliver outstanding sampling or retail-based activations via in-store sampling, mall sampling, product demonstrations, out-of-home sampling, event sampling and/or office sampling. Sampling must be the key aspect of this campaign, but judges will also be looking how the campaign integrates and leverages other media channels for amplification. They will also need to see clear evidence of how the sampling or activation delivered business results.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form G - Best Sampling or Retail Activation

H. Best Implementation or Production

Some campaigns aren’t about whiz-bang creative or long-term strategies, but rely on superb execution. From implementing a challenging media relations or stakeholder plan, to producing an activation, event or piece of content using creative provided to you. This category recognises entries that excel at implementation or production. Judges will be looking for evidence that shows how the implementation or production led to the success of the campaign. They will also need to understand the context as to why your implementation or production was so exceptional.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form H - Best Implementation or Production

I. Most Innovative Campaign

This category recognises campaigns led by PR, Experiential or Social that paved new ground, use emerging technologies, methods or ideas that achieve the campaign’s objectives and deliver outstanding results. The judges will be looking for disruptive thinking, revolutionary ideas and forward-thinking techniques that are implemented in new or unexpected ways.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form I - Most Innovative Campaign

J. Best Integrated Campaign

In this category we are looking for an epic campaign that was implemented across a multitude of channels including PR, Experiential and/or Social. This category is not about simply listing multiple channels and executions. Judges are looking for evidence that the campaign was seamlessly, and cleverly, integrated across a multitude of PRES channels. Entrants will need to show that each channel or activity was deliberately selected to enhance the idea and that the core strategic and creative thinking was adapted appropriately for each channel, that components were designed to coordinate with each other, and that each component played a significant role in delivering the results.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form J - Best Integrated Campaign

K. Best Strategic Thinking

This category recognises campaigns that demonstrate extraordinary insights and strategic thinking. The winning campaign will need to demonstrate the thinking process, highlight a clear strategic direction and how this directly contributed to the results. Judges will be looking for evidence of research, insight, quality of thinking and development of strategy.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form K - Best Strategic Thinking

L. Bravest Client

This category recognises entries that required true bravery and backing from a client who was prepared to take risks and do things differently. This bravery will have manifested itself in one of the following areas: media relations, a sponsorship or partnership, an outstanding experiential campaign, a public relations activation, an influencer marketing campaign or a social media campaign. Judges will be looking for evidence of how client bravery bought these campaigns to life. What client decisions were key? What risks were taken and why? What made the client brave in this instance? They will need to understand the client/agency working dynamic and how decisions the client made in partnership with the agency, delivered outstanding campaign results.

Download Cover Page | Download Entry Form L - Bravest Client

New awards celebrate best of Kiwi PR, experiential and social media

Posted 21 September 2018.

​​A new annual awards programme launching Monday 24th September 2018 will recognise the country’s most impressive PR, experiential and social media campaigns.

Judges are calling for entries for the inaugural PREScom Awards, run by the Comms Council’s PR, Experiential and Social Media Committee (PREScom).

PREScom chair Mark Pickering says the awards programme has been designed to fill a gap in the market. “While some awards shows have individual categories hat-tipping these marketing disciplines, there isn’t an awards programme solely for PR, experiential and social media agencies to support,” says Pickering. “We want to see the entire industry get behind it and make it our own.”

Awards categories include Best Use of Media Relations, Best Sponsorship or Media Partnership, Best Use of Social Media and Best Experiential or Event. An award for Bravest Client celebrates clients truly prepared to take risks and do things differently. “We’ve tried to be very modern in our approach to these awards, with categories reflecting the kinds of work the industry is now doing – experiential is not just events and modern-day PR is far from just traditional media relations,” says Pickering.

Comms Council CEO, Paul Head, says this is the time for PR, experiential and social professionals, and their clients, to shine. “All three disciplines have grown significantly in recent years and are an increasingly important component of the overall marketing mix,” he says. “The scale and scope of these campaigns show it’s time they now warrant their own awards programme.”

Alongside Pickering as chair, the PRESCom steering committee includes Rewa Willis (Sherson Willis), Dallas Gurney (Spark PR & Activate), Katharine Broughton (Katharine Broughton Consulting), Rochelle Sheldon (Socialites), Sean Brown (Mango), Angelina Farry (Eleven PR) and Gina McKinnon (Fuse) who also serves as Convenor of judges.

Entries open today and the awards event will be held on Thursday 22nd November. More information can be found here.

Come Hear The 2018 Effie International Judge Speak!

Posted 21 September 2018.

​The Comms Council in association with TVNZ, is delighted to present this year’s International Effie’s Judge, Mark Earls, (the Herdmeister) at the Effectiveness Function on Thursday 11th October, at TVNZ.

Mark Earles
Mark Earls

LIMITED SEATS BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL: email awards@commscouncil.nz

​Mark is a leading-edge thinker in behavioural and decision science who challenges much of the received wisdom about human behaviour. Mark has been a big champion of Behavioural Economics but has also championed the notion that we are social (HERD) creatures first and foremost, that much of our behaviour is shaped by what goes on between us (rather than simply between our ears) and finally that creativity is a team game rather than a solo act.

By attending this event you will hear Mark talk about how real advertising value comes from long-term behaviour change and how that requires a better understanding of how human behaviour really works. Mark will give pointers as to how agencies and marketers can find and use a better map to gain a huge competitive advantage.

There will be chance for Q&A.

Date: Thursday 11th October

Time: 5:30pm to 7:30pm - Drinks and canapés on arrival, Presentations begin at 6.00pm

Venue: TVNZ, Main reception, Hobson Street, Auckland

Cost: None

To register for this free event, email awards@commscouncil.nz today - spaces are limited and tickets for entry will be allocated.

The Comms Council thanks TVNZ for their support of this event.

PREScom Awards

Posted 20 September 2018.

PREScom Awards

Posted 20 September 2018.

2018 PREScom Awards - Key Dates

Posted 20 September 2018.

A new annual awards programme is launching Monday 24th September 2018 to recognise the country’s most impressive PR, experiential and social media campaigns.

Awards categories include Best Use of Media Relations, Best Sponsorship or Media Partnership, Best Use of Social Media and Best Experiential or Event.

Here are some key dates for your calendar

Call for entry open: Monday, 24 September 2018

Entries close: Wednesday, 24 October 2018

48hr late penalty deadline: Friday, 26 October 2018

Category judging: Wednesday, 7 November (Auckland full day)

Executive judging: Tuesday, 13 November (Auckland)

PREScom Awards Show: Thursday, 22 November

2018 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ Gala Dinner

Posted 18 September 2018.

​PURCHASE YOUR TICKET HERE

There are many paths to true enlightenment.

And yet there is only one award that celebrates it.

The Effies.

Revered by marketers and agencies globally as the pre-eminent award for marketing effectiveness, Effie celebrates all forms of marketing communication that contributes to a brand’s success.

The ‘Effie Effect’ means much more than a shiny award. It’s a seat of higher learning at a table few are invited to sit at. A deeper philosophy. One, when practised well, allows you to connect with New Zealand consumers on a deeply powerful, almost spiritual level.

By aligning the unshakeable trust of agency and client, you can create a powerful, unstoppable centre of energy, or chakra.

Great things are achieved when you align your chakras.

And so it is that the Effies looks to the next spiritual leaders to come forth. Let their auras fill our minds with blinding strategy and our hearts with brand love.

That is the Effie Effect.

Celebrate the Effie Effect at the 2018 New Zealand Effie Awards in association with TVNZ.

Date: Thursday 18th October

Pre-dinner drinks: 6.30pm

Show starts: 7.30pm

Venue: Shed 10, Queen’s Wharf, Auckland CBD

Cost (excl. GST and booking fees):

Member Single Ticket : $260.00

Member Table Package : $2,500.00

Non-Member Single Ticket : $385.00

Non-Member Table Package : $3,700.00

Thank you to our sponsors TVNZ, NZME, Nielsen, Bauer Media, Adshel, The Radio Bureau, Google and Soar Print.

Axis Awards 2019 Key Dates

Posted 10 September 2018.

​Key dates for your diary

Call for Entries goes live: Thursday 15th November 2018

Entries close: Tuesday 22nd January 2019 at 4pm

Late entry deadline closes: Thursday 24th January 2019 at 4pm

Hard copy material deadline: Friday 1st February 2019

Category Judging (Heritage Hotel): Tuesday 12th to Friday 15th February 2019 (inclusive)

Executive online judging: Monday 18th to Thursday 28th February 2019 (inclusive)

Finalists announced: Monday 18th February 2019

Tickets on sale: Thursday 14th February 2019

Metal discussion meeting if required: Monday 4th March 2019

Executive Judging Session: Wednesday 6th March 2019

Axis Speaks: Thursday 7th March 2019 (TBC - evening)

Awards Show: Thursday 14th March 2019, 6:30pm-12:00am

Building Diverse & Inclusive Agencies: Beyond the Buzzwords and into Best Practice

Posted 3 September 2018.

​Hosted by the Commercial Communications Council and Diversity Works New Zealand (DWNZ), this Breakfast Speaker Event will go beyond an introduction and will delve into best practice examples and real-world experiences from organisations which are developing sustainably inclusive and diverse workplaces.

​Not only will attendees leave inspired about generating effective inclusion and diversity in their agency, they will hear tools and tips from companies who are working towards strong inclusion & diversity programmes and their successes with this, and better understand the impact of client policy on agencies’ contractual obligations. This is a must attend session!

Rachel Hopkins, Chief Executive of DWNZ will provide case studies from the 2018 Diversity Awards NZ and speak about the importance of understanding your clients’ supply chain inclusiveness and diversity policies.

Jim Moser, Chief Executive, Clemenger Group NZ will speak about Clemenger’s journey towards inclusion and diversity, from where they started to where they are now.

This will be followed by a discussion with Mark Carrick, Diversity & Inclusion Lead, BNZ and Charlotte Downes, Diversity & Inclusion Manager, Air New Zealand who will share how they have navigated their client-side journeys towards inclusive and diverse workplaces. They will speak about the commercial benefits their organisations have experienced and their expectations of their agency partners.

WHO IS IT FOR?

All managers involved in recruitment of team members, whether HR or team leads, any members of agency Inclusiveness & Diversity committees, and anyone who is interested in the development of their own organisation’s Inclusiveness & Diversity programmes.

DETAILS

Wednesday 19th September, 7.30am – 9.00am

Raffles Room, Stamford Plaza, 22-26 Albert Street, Auckland

Comms Council members: $60 + GST, non-members: $75 + GST

Email office@commscouncil.nz to register for this event

MEET THE SPEAKERS


Rachel Hopkins

Chief Executive, Diversity Works NZ

Rachel is committed to equity and empowerment for all New Zealanders. She has degrees in Law and Feminist Studies, is a Chartered Member of the Institute of Directors and studied Design Thinking at Stanford University.

Rachel has owned her own business in Sydney and worked for the world’s largest law firm in London. In New Zealand, she has held various executive leadership roles in professional services, education and training.

Rachel’s volunteer work includes sitting on the Establishment Board of the Auckland Foundation’s Women’s Fund and the New Zealand Committee of the UN Women’s Empowerment Principles.



Jim Moser

Chief Executive, Clemenger Group NZ & Chairman of Clemenger BBDO Melbourne and Colenso BBDO

Jim Moser is CEO of the Clemenger Group New Zealand, and also Chairman of both Clemenger BBDO Melbourne and Colenso BBDO.

Jim has been with the Clemenger Group for 19 years having joined in 1999 after serving several years as Managing Director of BBDO Italy. He started his career with BBDO as Managing Director of BBDO Warsaw Group from 1994.

Jim has dual citizenship with the US and Australia. He holds a BA from DePauw University and a MBA from the Kellogg School at Northwestern University.




Mark Carrick

Diversity & Inclusion Lead, BNZ

Mark combines more than 20 years corporate HR experience with the latest best-practice thinking and scientific research. He has a pragmatic approach to balancing social justice with the commercial imperatives of business leaders, always striving to find mutually beneficial outcomes.

Mark has worked as an architectural draughtsman, a timeshare salesman and aerobics instructor before moving into banking. He has a passion for connecting with people, and believes difference should be valued.

Outside of work he is a snow skier and an ungraciously retired dancer. While he might give off a “pale stale male” image, he takes great delight in being a little bit different. His motto is never judge a book by its cover!




Charlotte Downes

Diversity & Inclusion Manager, Air New Zealand

Charlotte Downes is the Diversity and Inclusion Manager at Air New Zealand. Prior to Air New Zealand, Charlotte worked in Talent Acquisition for over 12 years in London and Shanghai for organisations such as ITV and Walt Disney.

She is passionate about her role in driving positive change towards Air New Zealand’s Diversity and Inclusion vision to create a diverse organisation, proudly representative of Aoteroa, where Air New Zealanders can be themselves and thrive.

She has a passion for all things diversity and championing inclusion and equality.

99 are BOTAB 2018 Champions

Posted 31 August 2018.

​The Signoffs from 99 have taken the title of BOTAB 2018 champions in front of a sell-out crowd at Galatos.

The giant $1500 travel cheque from Fortis Travel went to Ashlee Choi, the deserved drummer from MBM’s Rage Against the Machine-Learning.

Check out the photos here

For their efforts, 99 were awarded:

  • A production run of their own designed ice cream flavour from Much Moore Ice-Cream
  • Their biggest song recorded by Big Pop Studios
  • A $500 Lunch at Prego
  • A next-morning coffee run thanks to eighthirty coffee roasters
  • MOST IMPORTANTLY THE COVETED BOTAB TROPHY

Thanks to all the bands that competed:

  • Fish Taco - Flying Fish
  • Pegasus and the Job Numbers - Colenso BBDO
  • FCBC - FCB
  • The Strands - Saatchi & Saatchi
  • Friends Electric - Barnes, Catmur & Friends Dentsu
  • The Screaming O’s - Ogilvy
  • Rage Against the Machine-Learning - MBM
  • The Prototypes - Digital Arts Network + TBWA
  • The Signoffs - 99

A HUGE shoutout to our sponsors: Apex Insurance, Big Pop Studios, Fortis Travel, Event Cinemas, eighthirty coffee roasters, Whittakers, Radio Hauraki, SOAR Print, My Food Bag, Prego & Much Moore Ice-Cream.

Get your ticket - BOTAB 2018: Battle of the Renegades

Posted 15 August 2018.

​We have a whopping NINE agencies entered in what will be the biggest baddest BOTAB yet. Dust off your leather jacket and cammo gear because BOTAB 2018 is the Battle of the Renegades.

There’s a limited number of tickets, so gather your agency groupies and get yours today.

This year there are 9 of the best agency bands going head-to-head:

  • Last year’s winners, Fish Taco - Flying Fish
  • Pegasus and the Job Numbers - Colenso BBDO
  • FCBC - FCB
  • The Strands - Saatchi & Saatchi
  • Friends Electric - Barnes, Catmur & Friends Dentsu
  • The Screaming O’s - Ogilvy
  • Rage Against the Machine-Learning - MBM
  • The Prototypes - Digital Arts Network + TBWA
  • The Signoffs - 99

The first 200 people through the door will get a FREE LUCKY TACO so don’t be late! Much Moore ice-cream will have you covered for free dessert.

We’ve got loads of spot prizes on the night including bar tabs courtesy of Apex Insurance and Big Pop Studios, Event Cinema tickets, and Gourmet My Food Bags.

Thanks to our fabulous sponsors who make it happen and for the amazing prizes – Fortis Travel and their special getaway prize, eighthirty coffee roasters and their morning after coffee run, Radio Hauraki, chocolate from Whittakers, Soar Print, Prego and the $500 lunch.

GET YOUR TICKET HERE

justONE

Posted 15 August 2018.

Meet the International Judge - 2018 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ

Posted 8 August 2018.

​Mark Earls

@herdmeister www.herdhq.com

Mark is a recovering account planner who has run agencies large and small. He has written a number of award-winning and best-selling books about human behaviour, creativity and innovation. These include Welcome to the Creative Age, HERD, I’ll Have What She’s Having (with Professors Alex Bentley and Mike O’Brien), CopyCopyCopy - how to do better marketing by using other people’s ideas and most recently Creative SuperPow-ers (with Daniele Fiandaca, Laura Jordan Bambach and Scott Morrison)

He has also written for many magazines, journals and newspapers and appeared on British, American, Irish, Indian and Dutch TV and radio but his favourite piece remains a double page spread in The Sun newspaper about the London Riots (“Come and have a go if you think you’re HERD enough”). And appeared on more stages than Elvis (well, almost).

Mark’s work applies leading-edge behavioural and decision science to challenge much of the received wisdom about human behaviour. He’s been a big champion of Behavioral Economics but has championed the notion that we are social (HERD) creatures first and foremost, that much of our behaviour is shaped by what goes on between us (ra-ther than simply between our ears) and finally that creativity is a team game rather than a solo act.

He advises a wide range of organizations from corporations to start-ups, charities and governments, both in the UK and around the world and is in much demand as a speaker and as a conference curator and programmer.

Mark has judged all kinds of strategy and effectiveness awards - IPA, APG, Marketing So-ciety, 4A’s, ADFX; he is a Fellow of The UK Marketing Society and the RSA, an Honor-ary Fellow of the IPA and an Ambassador of The School of Life. But mostly, he would rather be fishing or watching cricket.

Effie Awards Gala Dinner

Posted 6 August 2018.

First Five Dates with the FFR

Posted 6 August 2018.

PURCHASE YOUR TICKET HERE​​

Ever wished you knew a friendly face at a media party or wanted a buddy to chat to in that sometimes awkward half hour for mingling prior to an event?

Well, the First Five Rungs want to help you get to know other like-minded young people in the advertising and communications industry, building your connections and networking skills.

The First Five Rungs presents…

First Five Dates with the FFR

If you’re in your first five years of the advertising and comms industry, rally up your agency friends and come along to speed date others just like you. And before you panic over the pressure of a typical first date, don’t worry – this is a ‘FFR First Date’ for networking so it’s completely casual and totally not romantic (although who knows where your networking will lead!). We’ll provide the pizza and beers, you just need to provide some quality chat.

Details

When: 12th September

Where: Bauer, City Works Depot

Who: Anyone in their first five years of the advertising and communications industry. Feel free to come solo or come with a team!

Tickets

$15 (gets you two drinks, pizza and hopefully some awesome new buddies)

No door sales

PURCHASE YOUR TICKET HERE

Please note that there is limited parking in the vicinity, so we recommend you take an Uber or taxi.

Sponsored by the great folk at Bauer Media.

BOTAB 2018: Battle of the Renegades

Posted 5 July 2018.

​​Flying Fish and the Comms Council present the 11th annual Battle of the Ad Bands – Battle of the Renegades.

BAND REGISTRATIONS ARE NOW CLOSED.

To mark the first BOTAB in our new home – Galatos, we’re throwing out the rulebook and allowing ring-ins. That’s one Renegade ring-in per band.

To claim the auspicious title of 2018 BOTAB champions, each band will have 15 minutes to impress the judges.

The BOTAB Committee will be dishing out renegade anthems as the wildcard - some guaranteed crowd-pleasers.

All the rules are on www.botab.co.nz

For those of you who didn’t make the cut for your agency band, you can get your tickets mid-August for the battle on Thursday 30th August.

Theme: Battle of the Renegades

Date: Thursday 30th August 2018, 6:30pm

Venue: Galatos

Website: www.botab.co.nz

Questions? Email Katie ward at office@commscouncil.nz

How to write an Effie

Posted 2 July 2018.

​This is a guide to refer to while writing your Effie Award entry. It outlines, section by section, tips for what to include, and an explanation of what judges will be looking for and awarding points to.

We strongly recommend you read this guide before beginning to write your paper.


DOWNLOAD THE GUIDE HERE

Comms Council announces new Chair of PREScom

Posted 2 July 2018.

​The Comms Council is pleased to announce the appointment of Mark Pickering; Director, Brand Spanking to the position of Chair for the PR, Experiential, and Social Media Committee (PREScom).

​Mark is a founding member of PREScom and the Experiential Marketing Association of NZ (EMANZ). He has contributed to a number of strategic projects and events in that time which have benefited the industry.

Mark has over 30 years’ experience in the industry and has worked on the world’s biggest brands; creating, planning and delivering award-winning campaigns globally.

In 2007, Mark established FLUXX: Ideas in Motion, an experiential agency which merged with Brand Spanking in 2015 to form one of the largest and most dynamic agencies in this field in NZ.

Mark is a social media and event technology strategist within Brand Spanking’s team and has brought his knowledge to bear for clients. He is a passionate evangelist for the industry and also lectures and runs regular workshops and seminars globally on experiential marketing.

“Mark is at the forefront of the experiential marketing industry and his strategic vision will prove invaluable in continuing to raise the profile and strength of the marcomms sector”, said Paul Head, CEO Comms Council.

The Comms Council PREScom is charged with highlighting and developing the value of PR, experiential and social media communications. Members are drawn from independent agencies or marcomms divisions within larger agency groups that are involved in a wide range of marketing communications including public relations, ambient, activation, social media, experiential or events.

Mark replaces Adelle Keely; Chief Executive, Acumen Republic who has been Chair since early 2017.

Paul Head thanked Adelle for her dedication during her time as Chair, saying, “Adelle has done an incredible job as Chair of PREScom over the past year and her leadership and guidance of the group has made a genuine difference for our members”.

Mark adds, “Over the past 10 years PREScom has worked hard to champion our channels to clients and to the wider marcomms industry through events, rewarding best practice via the Axis and Effie Awards and by sharing knowledge and insights from the top minds in the business. This year will see a focus on showcasing best practice here in NZ and overseas in PR, Social and Experiential marketing and in helping to develop badly needed talent for our industries”.

The Comms Council PREScom comprises Mark Pickering (Brand Spanking), Angelina Farry (Eleven PR), Dallas Gurney (Spark PR & Activate), Gina McKinnon (FUSE), Katharine Broughton (Beat Communications), Rewa Willis (Sherson Willis), Rochelle Sheldon (Socialites), and Sean Brown (Mango).

​The Comms Council issues an Inclusiveness & Diversity Policy for use in member agencies

Posted 29 June 2018.

​Last year, a survey of the industry conducted by the Commercial Communications Council found that there is widespread understanding of the need for greater diversity in the industry, however there is a clear gap when it comes to formal policies and programmes within agencies. In response to these findings, the Comms Council Inclusiveness & Diversity Group set a goal that all member agencies have an Inclusiveness & Diversity Policy in place by the end of 2018.

Today, the Comms Council released a policy tool for agencies to adopt, designed to be tailored to the needs of each organisation.

The policy includes a checklist of practical steps which an HR department or management team can take to ensure their organisation works towards inclusiveness and diversity.

The Inclusiveness and Diversity Group has acknowledged that having a policy and implementing it are two different things, so the Group is working with Diversity Works New Zealand to run Inclusiveness & Diversity workshops later in the year for HR departments and managers. The workshops will provide the tools needed to help create a fully inclusive and diverse workplace.

Inclusiveness & Diversity Group Chair, Megan Clark said, “Inclusiveness and diversity go hand in hand – one cannot exist without the other – and assisting agencies with a toolkit to effect change in providing an inclusive
workplace is a practical yet important tool to help agencies on the journey to a vibrantly diverse and inclusive culture. We look forward to rolling out the next phase of education, awareness and talent pool development in the coming months.”

“Advertising is an industry built on creating transformative ideas for businesses, so it is important to strive for diversity in thinking to keep on the forefront of innovation and creativity. The industry must be representative of the population its’ brands are looking to connect with or risk being less effective. This policy tool is a step in the right direction”, said Comms Council CEO Paul Head.

The policy has been sent to all member CEO’s and HR departments and will be held on the Comms Council website for member agencies under Industry Resources.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE I&D POLICY

Inclusiveness & Diversity Policy Tool

Posted 28 June 2018.

​After consultation with both HR representatives and Diversity Works NZ, the Comms Council Inclusiveness & Diversity Council have finalised an I&D Policy Template.

The document is designed to be used by members who don’t currently have a policy in place. It is reasonably high level and therefore isn’t prescriptive, providing core principles of I&D that will allow you to implement it in a way that is best for your business and your people.

We see the provision and implementation of practical tools as a catalyst to start to foster change across the industry. The benefits of a more diverse workforce are now well understood. As well as simply being the right thing to do, greater diversity also has a tangible commercial benefit and if our industry is to continue to thrive it must be more representative of more New Zealanders.

It’s our goal that all member agencies have a policy in place (either this one or another one) by the end of 2018 and that all staff members are both aware of it being an important agency policy, and of the importance that their organisation places on I&D.

The 2018 Effie Awards Convenor’s Wise Words - David McIndoe

Posted 25 June 2018.

​​There’s never been a better time to be a marketer.

We’ve got access to tools our forebears would hardly believe, levels of data that allow for finer and finer resolution, while everyday exciting new ways to connect with our audiences are devised.

It is into this rapid evolution and re-invention that marketing’s enduring functions become all the more important. To see beyond the how and solve for the why. Our own why. To determine our success for the future by defining it for ourselves, and not by simply keeping pace with it.

Longer term strategies need patience, bravery but also vision. To see beyond the next financial year, but also beyond the lure of letting “because we can” become our strategy by default.

To use the available means to our own ends, and not let the means become our master.

As a committee we are continuing to rebalance the Effies towards an emphasis on long-term thinking, long-term strategies and long-term success. Those strategies and ideas that pay back business but also pay it forward.

Of course, we need to continually have an eye to the approaches that answer short-term problems, opportunistic ideas that can steal a lead, open new possibilities and capture available value in the market. Does this rebalancing mean “big” activity will rule? Not so. Rather, in all actions we should be guided by a bigger ambition and broader intent for our businesses.

Long-term success and ROI shouldn’t be at odds with each other, but often the most available evidence of success is from short term measures – indeed showing success in the long run is a challenge in of itself. Long term measurement requires investment of its own, strategies of its own, together with more subtle and informed analysis.

To allow for this, we are creating a new structure to the results sections in most papers. Here we will allow for ROI and evidence of long term success. We’re also introducing a short-term success paper so we can celebrate the smarts and savvy that go into winning the day.

Brands and the ideas that power them are business assets. They require vision to be built, they need to be deliberately maintained, jealously guarded, and leveraged with care. The value of these assets pay back over many years to come.

We look forward to another year celebrating world class thinking from New Zealand, sharing in the fierce and friendly competition of the industry that results in enduring advantage for our businesses and continue eminence of New Zealand in the world of marketing.

Best of luck with your entry.

Important Changes - The 2018 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ

Posted 19 June 2018.

This year Effies continues to bring attention to longer-term successes; campaigns that have gone beyond short-term returns and created genuine lasting change for an organisation. As part of this, the eligible entry dates for Effies remain longer to create a bigger window of eligibility for any long-term success stories. The intention of these new dates is to allow campaigns from the last 2 years an opportunity to demonstrate their success across a longer period of time than previously possible.

Eligibility Period: Marketing communications campaigns (& results) that ran in NZ between 14 June 2016 and 14 June 2018 will be eligible to enter.

    • However, it is the expectation that any papers entered in the 2017 Effie’s that are now eligible for a second time must demonstrate additional success and significant new results AFTER June 2017 to be considered an Effie winner.
    • All category descriptions, entry forms and judging forms were revised slightly in 2017 to draw focus to longer-term thinking where possible. Please read your entry forms carefully. Note the 5% now in every results section awarded for any longer term or sustained results.
    • There is a new category to allow to excellence in short-term challenges and impact campaigns – Short Term Success. Please read the entry criteria for this on page 25.
    • There have been changes to the results section of each entry form around ROI. The commercial benefit to the business can now be expressed as either an ROI (return on investment figure), or you can demonstrate commercial payback that justifies the investment in the campaign in any way necessary.
    • There have been slight changes in the way Progressive has been articulated. Please read the Progressive entry category carefully before starting your entry
    • Please note your entry may be published after the Effie Awards in its entirety. For the GOLD winners we will provide the opportunity to INDEX any sensitive information previously supplied in RED. This will allow the best examples of effective advertising to be available for sharing and learning purposes.

    THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

    Call For Entries - The 2018 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ

    Posted 31 May 2018.

    Read the Call For Entries Documentation - DOWNLOAD HERE

    Read all the changes for 2018 HERE

    To download the Effie Writing Guide, CLICK HERE

    To register your entry, click HERE

    Entries Closed - Extended Deadline - Thursday 16th August - 4.00pm

    Categories & Entry Forms

    A. Charity/Not for Profit

    Promoting a particular not-for-profit association, special interest group charity or charitable society. Typically fund-raising or promoting the work of the charity. Judges are looking for proof that your communications drove a very positive outcome for the charity either by way of fundraising or brand-building or public support for the organisation and its cause.

    Download Entry Form A - Charity/ Not for Profit

    B. Social Marketing/Public Service
    Marketing communications of a public service nature, including campaigns to promote social or behavioural change. This typically involves government department, local body or community service campaigns. Judges are looking for proof that your communications significantly contributed to a positive social change, driving a valuable outcome of social good, i.e. you changed how people think or what they do in-line with stated campaign objectives.

    Download Entry Form B - Social Marketing/ Public Service

    C. Retail/Etail
    Stores and/or websites that provide either a diverse range of merchandise (e.g. department store) or that specialise in a particular line of products. More than just your normal product and price advertising, good retail campaigns need to fundamentally develop a stronger brand proposition, a larger customer base and grow overall sales value. Judges are looking for proof that your communications grew the brand, grew the customer base, grew sales and blew the category and the competitors out of the water. If you just discounted some product and slapped up a “SALE” poster then don’t bother entering.

    Download Entry Form C - Retail/ Etail

    D. Business to Business (B2B)
    The Business to Business category is designed for campaigns that are directed from one company to another within a professional, trade or industry context, as opposed to consumers. It is about returning enduring business value through commercial creativity and delivering growth (i.e. margin/sales). It is very important in this category to clarify exactly what the role of the campaign was and how it worked to influence the attitudes and behaviour of the target market. Judges will be looking for insight, innovation and irrefutable proof that communication has been instrumental in delivering ongoing business-to-business outcomes.

    Download Entry Form D - Business to Business

    E. Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG)
    All fast moving consumer goods products (NB: established in the market for over 12 months). This is one of the most popular categories, so if your stuff didn’t fly off the shelves or out of the chillers, think hard before you start writing. Typically one of the most creative categories, competition in store and in the Effies is fierce and only the strongest will survive. Judges are looking for proof that your strategy is fresh, original and creative and changed the way consumers purchase. You either grew the pie or you just ate the other guy’s pie, but whatever you did, you made a big impact.

    Download Entry Form E - Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG)

    F. Consumer Durables
    Any product which is not purchased on a regular basis, and where there is a high involvement decision-making process. For instance: motor vehicles, white goods, brown goods, household furnishings, electronics and pharmaceuticals. This category is full of surprises attracting a wide range of entries from pills to push bikes to Porsches. It is definitely a category where we will be comparing apples and oranges. The judges are looking for proof of the difficulties of competing in this category and that your communications pushed the client way out in front of its competitors. You need to prove that you deserve an Effie ahead of that guy who threw in a set of free steak knives.

    Download Entry Form F - Consumer Durables

    G. Consumer Services

    Open to companies whose main focus is providing a service to the consumer. For instance: airlines, hotels, tourism, energy suppliers, financial services, telecommunications and entertainment. The services companies typically do well at the Effies. Judges are looking for proof that communications helped companies to differentiate their brands and drive their service proposition to build stronger customer engagement and revenues over time.

    Download Entry Form G - Consumer Services

    H. New Product or Service

    These must be NEW products, services, brands or variants developed to exist beyond just the campaign period (i.e. not a line extension or limited time offer). To be eligible, a NEW campaign must have launched within the eligibility period of 14 June 2016 and 14 June 2018. Results for launches are always good in the first year, so you’ll need to clearly demonstrate to the judges why the results were above and beyond what would ordinarily be expected. Results can be measured until close of entry in August.

    Download Entry Form H - New Product or Service

    I. Limited Budget: Less than $100,000

    Campaigns with a total production and media spend of $100,000 or less. It must be a stand-alone campaign as opposed to a single execution of a larger campaign. This category is all about achieving a lot for a little. Judges are looking for strategic thinking, creative work and results that show how to convert a modest budget into a significant commercial result. Note: the budget limit of $100,000 must include the cost of any promotional prizes or incentives.

    Download Entry Form I - Limited Budget: Less than $100,000


    In particular, the judges will be looking for strength of proof that only because of this idea and type of campaign the claimed business results could have been achieved.

    J. Most Effective Integrated Campaign

    Here we’re looking for where the power of a really big idea allowed a campaign to translate across all the relevant channels to deliver an exceptional result. This is not about simply listing multiple channels and executions. Judges are looking for evidence that the integration was a consequence of an idea so big that it broke out of the category and resulted in a combination of traditional, innovative and unexpected activities. Judges will be expecting to see measures proving the link between the communication idea and the resulting integration; this will be critical to proving the effectiveness of the campaign. Entrants will need to show that each channel or activity was deliberately selected to enhance the idea and that the core strategic and creative thinking was adapted appropriately for each component, that components were designed to coordinate with each other, and that each component played a significant role in delivering the results.

    Download Entry Form J - Most Effective Integrated Campaign

    K. Most Effective Social Media Campaign

    Campaigns that set out with the explicit purpose of using social as the primary communication channel or have social at their heart. The kind of idea that is specifically designed to take advantage of the socially connected consumer and the influence of social. Judges are looking for campaigns that begin with a social idea, as opposed to advertising or integrated campaigns reformatted for a social media environment. They’ll need a clear rationale for why social was the right way to tackle the client’s brief, and evidence of how social activity measurably and materially drove the commercial result. It is not enough to count the number of impressions, likes or shares. You should demonstrate how this social activity resulted in a change in behaviour or a meaningful impact on the brand. You will need to measure and prove the commercial value of social through the direct effect it had on consumer behaviour or perceptions for lasting change beyond the life of the campaign, and demonstrate correlation with the achieved business results.

    Download Entry Form K - Most Effective Social Media Campaign

    L. Effective Use of Digital Technology

    Campaigns that have digital technology at their heart. The kind of idea that demonstrates how the digital innovation or solution maximised the communication impact and achieved the campaign objective. Judges are looking for campaigns that begin with a digital idea, as opposed to advertising or integrated campaigns with a digital element. They’ll need a clear rationale for why digital technology was the most creative way to tackle the client’s brief, and evidence of how the digital technology measurably and materially drove the commercial result. You will need to measure and prove the effect it had on consumer behaviour, perceptual shifts and how it correlates with positive and sustainable business results.

    Download Entry Form L - Most Effective Use of Digital Technology

    M. Most Effective Use of Data

    Campaigns that used progressive data methods or data technologies to crack an insight that led to the campaign. Judges are looking for strategic interpretation of data into a meaningful insight and how that insight brought the idea to life. This category should demonstrate how progressive or original analytical technologies or techniques were harnessed in order to better interpret the consumer or category. Entrants will need to illustrate how the insight creatively informed the communication. You will need to measure and prove the effect the insight had on making the campaign more effective in delivering business results over time.

    Download Entry Form M - Most Effective Use of Data

    N. Most Effective PR/Experiential Campaign

    Campaigns that have a PR or experiential idea at their heart. The kind of idea that sets out with the explicit purpose to get the media talking or involve consumers in a tangible experience that delivers on the brand’s positioning or business objectives. Judges are looking for campaigns that begin with a PR or experiential idea, as opposed to marketing or integrated campaigns with a PR or experiential element. They’ll need a clear rationale for why PR or experiential was the right way to tackle the client’s brief, and evidence of how the PR or experiential activity measurably and materially drove the commercial result. Strength of proof will rely on demonstrating the link between this activity and how it has shifted consumer perceptions and behaviour in a way that has tangibly driven a sustained business effect.

    Download Entry Form N - Most Effective PR/ Experiential Campaign

    O. Best Strategic Thinking

    Campaigns that display particularly strong strategic thinking. This is the thinking before the creative brief, as opposed to the creative idea or execution. Judges are looking for examples of where an agency has taken a client’s brief, and through fresh insight or inspired problem solving, developed a ground breaking strategic direction. Judges will need to see a clear delineation between the strategic and creative thinking, and understand how the strategic and creative platforms have or will deliver long-term success for the brand.

    Download Entry Form O - Best Strategic Thinking

    P. Most Progressive Campaign

    Campaigns that break marketing’s mould and achieve their communications objectives in highly innovative ways. Judges are looking for strategic thinking, creative ideas and campaign construction that is highly provocative, and which challenges advertising or marketing’s conventions. Just being different or new is not enough. Winning campaigns will need to demonstrate how the progressive nature of the campaign created the sustained commercial result.

    Download Entry Form P - Most Progressive Campaign

    Q. Short-Term Success

    This category is for short-term impact campaigns that are designed to work within a 6 month period. This could be a day, a week, or a number of months. Judges will be looking for proof around the business challenge, where the insight and strategy came from, the excellent execution and how it delivered great results that met short-term objectives.

    Download Entry Form Q - Short-Term Success

    R. Sustained Success

    Products or services that have experienced sustained success for a period of at least 36 months. Entries must have a common objective and utilised the same strategy throughout the length of the campaign. They may have done so using different executions, but still deliver to the core insight and idea. The current year’s results may be included and be shown to build on the previous results. This award recognises strategy and creative platforms that are ‘built to last’ and demonstrate effectiveness over time. Judges will be looking for proof around the scale of the challenge, where the strategy came from, where it’s going and how it continued to deliver results over a sustained period of time.

    Download Entry Form R - Sustained Success

    S. Individual Marketer of the Year

    This award recognises the role that an individual marketer plays in the development of effective work across a year. Judges will be looking for a marketing client who has lead their agencies in the marketing of a brand which has clearly excelled not only in the last 12 months, but who are setting their brand up for the long term. Judges seek evidence of a compelling brand story that inspires and motivates employees and partners, and is evident in all of the brand’s touchpoints.

    Judges will be looking for marketers who inspire their agency, who challenge them whilst giving them the freedom to succeed, and whose business results were the outcomes of genuine collaboration and friendship.

    This is an award for a client that is great to work with and gets great results out of their agencies. It’s therefore about more than a single campaign. The marketer of the year should be an inspirational figure to other marketers, who can represent marketing to the wider business community.

    Your nomination entry form should be submitted to Natasha Galloway on natasha@commscouncil.nz

    Cost to enter is $600 + GST for members. $1200 + GST for non-members.

    Download Entry Form S - Individual Marketer of the Year

    Executive Judges’ Choice Awards

    Note: These special categories cannot be entered and are awarded either by the Executive Judging Panel from the small pool of winning finalists or through the calculation of points.

    Hardest Challenge

    Campaigns that begin with an extraordinary degree of difficulty, and achieve the seemingly impossible. Judges are looking for evidence that the challenge to the agency was an extremely tough one and, where relevant, that success was sustained. The campaign objectives will need to be very well qualified with a clear description of why they are so challenging. The winner will demonstrate strategic thinking, creative work and results that show how to succeed against all odds. Judges will favour entries and campaigns that provide evidence of sustained effects.

    Most Effective Client of the Year

    Awarded to the client who is the most outstanding performer on the night across all categories. The award is based on the weighted value of Gold, Silver, Bronze Effie Awards won and finalist entries. The Grand Effie winner will receive 12 points, 8 points are awarded for Gold, 6 for Silver, 4 for Bronze and 2 for a finalist as per the global Effie Effectiveness rankings. Points are calculated and the winner is identified.

    Most effective Agency of the Year

    This award recognises the most significant contribution made by an advertising agency to the success of their clients in the Effie Awards and reflects the true partnership between agency and client in achieving outstanding effectiveness in marketing communications. The award is based on the weighted value of Gold, Silver and Bronze Effie Awards won and number of finalist entries. The Grand Effie winner will receive 12 points. 8 points are awarded for Gold, 6 for Silver, 4 for Bronze and 2 for a finalist. Points are calculated and the winner is identified. Agencies listed as a contributing agency will also receive points as outlined in the call for entry document.

    Note that the gold award that becomes the Grand Effie winner will not have double points awarded, i.e. a Grand Effie contributes only 12 points, not 12 points plus the 8 points for the related gold award.

    Similarly, points will only be awarded for the highest award received. Therefore points for a gold or silver award will not also receive finalist points.

    The Most Effective Agency of the Year and Hardest Challenge do not receive points in the Global Effie Effectiveness Index.

    Grand Effie® sponsored by TVNZ

    All Gold Effie category winners will be eligible for the Grand Effie. This award is given to the campaign that achieved the most extraordinary commercial result for its client. Judges will evaluate the magnitude of the results, the return the client received on their investment and the evidence of that return having been driven by the agency’s campaign, to recognise the most effective campaign from a commercial results perspective.

    The winner of the 2018 Grand Effie will also receive the prize of $100,000 in TVNZ airtime.*

    * Grand Effie Prize Conditions:

    The $100,000 in TVNZ air time must be used between January 2019 and August 2019.

    Air time will be placed by TVNZ in conjunction with the winner’s agency.

    Air time to be placed in non-core and non-peak programming and is subject to availability at the time of booking.

    Air time is at rate card and valued at time of booking.

    Air time to be booked at quarter opening.

    Usual Terms and Conditions apply.


    NZ Effie Awards 2018

    C/O The Conference Company
    31C Normanby Road, Mt Eden, Auckland 1024
    PO Box 90 040, Auckland 1142
    Ph: 09 360 1240
    Email: effie@tcc.co.nz

    Individual Marketer of the Year - The 2018 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ

    Posted 31 May 2018.

    ​This award recognises the role that an individual marketer plays in the development of effective work across a year.

    Download the entry form here

    This award recognises the role that an individual marketer plays in the development of effective work across a year. Judges will be looking for a marketing client who has lead their agencies in the marketing of a brand which has clearly excelled not only in the last 12 months, but who are setting their brand up for the long term. Judges seek evidence of a compelling brand story that inspires and motivates employees and partners, and is evident in all of the brand’s touchpoints.

    Judges will be looking for marketers who inspire their agency, who challenge them whilst giving them the freedom to succeed, and whose business results were the outcomes of genuine collaboration and friendship.

    This is an award for a client that is great to work with and gets great results out of their agencies. It’s therefore about more than a single campaign. The marketer of the year should be an inspirational figure to other marketers, who can represent marketing to the wider business community.

    ​Entry forms for this award will be available to DOWNLOAD HERE from 19th June and will be open until August 23rd at 4pm.Your nomination entry form should be submitted to Natasha Galloway on natasha@commscouncil.nz

    Cost to enter is $600 + GST for members. $1200 + GST for non-members.

    THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:

    DOWNLOAD THE PRESENTATION - Effie Entry Writing Workshop 2018

    Posted 21 May 2018.

    CLICK HERE to download the presentation given by the 2018 Effie awards Convenor, David McIndoe.

    • ​​Understand what the judges are looking for from an entry
    • Look through historical entries and understand what makes an effective marketing campaign and therefore Effie paper
    • Learn what evidence you need to put together to write your Effie paper and the new rules for 2018

    THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:

    Winner - Sandy Smith Inspiring Individual Award sponsored by MediaWorks

    Posted 9 May 2018.

    ​Congratulations to Robert Harvey, CEO Dentsu Aegis Network!

    GOLD CASE STUDIES - The 2018 Beacon Awards in association with NZME

    Posted 9 May 2018.

    ​​Take a look at the videos below explaining why these deserving campaigns won GOLD and have a read through the case studies.

    Skinny Mobile / PHD - The Best ‘Freekend’ Christmas Ever!

    Consumer Services

    Most Effective

    PAK’n'SAVE / FCB Media - Meatrimony The ‘Perfect’ Marriage

    Retail/Etail

    Water Safety New Zealand / FCB Media - The Swim Reaper

    Social Marketing / Public Service

    Best Use of Social

    Westpac NZ / FCB Media - The Inequality Issue

    Best Small Budget

    Best Creative Media Idea

    Best Collaboration

    European Motor Distributors / FCB Media - Audi - The Melting Offer

    Best Use of Event/Activation

    Kiwibank / OMD - Mind Over Money

    Best Use of Content

    Best Communications Strategy

    Fire & Emergency New Zealand / FCB Media - Igniting Action

    Social Marketing / Public Service

    Best Communications Strategy

    Best Launch

    Best Use of Technology

    Movember Foundation / Carat, BC&F Dentsu & MKTG - The Right to Grow

    Charity

    Testicular Cancer New Zealand / FCB Media - An Uncomfortable Topic

    Charity

    Serato / MBM - Propensity to DJ

    Best Use of Data

    Media Works / PHD - Helping Newshub Win the Election

    Best Use of Technology

    MetlifeCare / Carat - Life Begins at MetlifeCare

    Best Use of Insight

    Cheers & Uber / MBM - A Message From My Sober Self

    Best Creative Media Idea

    Best Use of Mobile

    The Winners - The 2018 Beacon Awards in association with NZME

    Posted 9 May 2018.

    ​MAJOR AWARDS

    Best in Show - sponsored by SKY: FCB Media and Westpac NZ

    Media Agency of the Year - sponsored by NZME: PHD

    Advertiser of the Year - sponsored by NZME: Fire & Emergency New Zealand

    Sandy Smith Inspiring Individual Award - sponsored by MediaWorks: Robert Harvey, CEO Dentsu Aegis Network

    Media Business of the Year: MediaWorks

    Sales Person / Team of the Year - sponsored by BigMobile: Adshel

    FCB Media / Westpac NZ - Best in Show
    FCB Media / Westpac NZ - Best in Show

    PHD - Media Agency of the Year
    PHD - Media Agency of the Year

    Fire & Emergency New Zealand - Advertiser of the Year
    Fire & Emergency New Zealand - Advertiser of the Year

    MediaWorks - Media Business of the Year
    MediaWorks - Media Business of the Year

    Adshel - Sales Person / Team of the Year
    Adshel - Sales Person / Team of the Year

    Robert Harvey - Sandy Smith Inspiring Individual Award
    Robert Harvey - Sandy Smith Inspiring Individual Award

    The automation debate and the opportunity to pivot

    Posted 17 April 2018.

    By John Baker, Managing Director, Lassoo Media & PR

    ​​Debate has raged for a number of years now around the merits of programmatic trading of digital advertising, with considerable focus from some commentators on its perceived risks. The negative focus has largely been on the issues of advertising fraud, viewability and brand safety.

    The principle of programmatic concerns some media owners who perceive a risk to their existing media distribution model as, increasingly, advertising and content is served to consumers directly from other platforms based on behavioural data. The media owner ‘gatekeeper’ status for consumers has eroded.

    But let’s be frank. The issues of ad fraud, viewability and brand safety have been with us since the development of contemporary media and well before the internet. Publishers and broadcasters have never been able to guarantee that 100% of their audience is exposed to ads, the risk of negative content adjacent to advertising campaigns has always been with us and there have always been crooks. Yes, some of these issues (particularly brand safety) have been amplified but they are not new and certainly not exclusive to programmatic digital or digital advertising per se. Let’s remember what nineteenth century Philadelphia retailer John Wanamaker said: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half”.

    Addressing these issues and mitigating these risks has always been a key role of agencies and the suggestion (from some) that agencies might be broadly complicit in negative aspects of programmatic trading does not stack up.

    The issue of “relevancy” has been one of the biggest vulnerabilities of traditional media planning and it is in this area, in particular, that the use of smart data and automation can optimise client investment alongside a more traditional approach. As data products and machine learning improve and evolve, expect this to become more significant with a greater focus on consumer value and utility across all media platforms, including traditional channels like television. The future looks good.

    Another debate centres on the supply chain of automated digital, with sometimes legitimate questions asked about what is being funded and how this may dilute the digital ad spend on its way to the publisher. As we move to programmatic trading across platforms like TV and OOH, don’t expect these questions to go away.

    While there is need for greater transparency to build marketer confidence, it is illogical to suggest that the technology, IP and resource that delivers automation and optimises targeting should not come at a cost. Traditional media company structures with large commercial teams that intermediate between markets/agencies and audiences have always been a part of the media spend on the way through to reaching the consumer. I don’t advocate the end of media sales teams, as they often add significant value, but I do question the modus operandi of some media companies. It’s time to pivot.

    At a time when revenue is challenged, media owners might reflect on the intrinsic value they provide agencies and marketers, and that is to deliver deeply engaged audiences within relevant contextual environments.

    The reason why so much investment is made in Google and Facebook is because it works. Many agencies and clients would like to see more marketing dollars funding New Zealand journalism, but first and foremost we have a duty to deliver optimal returns on marketing investment. The legacy model of some media companies is damaging to innovation and competitiveness.

    It is time for established media companies to re-examine their service, utility and ideas; focusing on the journalistic and creative elements that make their media compelling to audiences. To invest in more and better journalism, creativity and content and to consider how to optimise automation and data to make their alternatives more attractive to trade with and leverage to create demand.

    NZ Effie Awards 2018 in association with TVNZ - Key Dates

    Posted 9 April 2018.


    Call for entries issued: Tuesday 19 June

    Entry Writing Workshop: Thursday 21 June, 9am - 11am

    Entries close: Tuesday 14 August, 4pm

    48hr late penalty deadline: Thursday 16 August, 4pm

    Preliminary judging: Tuesday 4 September (Auckland) and Thursday 6 September (Wellington)

    Campaign material due: Tuesday 18 September

    Finalists announced: Thursday 27 September

    Category judging: Wednesday 26 September (Auckland)

    Executive judging: Wednesday 10 October (Auckland)

    Effectiveness Function Thursday 11 October

    Effie Awards Show: Thursday 18 October

    THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:

    Big Mobile

    Posted 5 April 2018.

    The Commercial Communications Council supports the launch of Think TV

    Posted 3 April 2018.

    ​The Commercial Communications Council was pleased the see the launch of Think TV into the New Zealand market late last week.

    ​Think TV is a collective voice for the industry to celebrate and hero the scale and effectiveness of television advertising in New Zealand.

    Research in recent years by marketing experts such as Peter Field and Mark Ritson has brought increasing focus on the need for marketers and their agencies to not lose sight of the power of strong brands to deliver long term business growth.

    Comms Council CEO Paul Head said, “There is overwhelming evidence of the power of TV and video to help build sustainable and profitable brands. TV remains a critical medium in this market. It is highly effective at telling stories that engage consumers. As an industry, building engagement is central to how we should be fostering long-term brands for our clients and we welcome the launch of Think TV as a powerful tool to make this case”

    Comms Council President Louise Bond said, “TV has long been a core platform for brands and remains an important channel in a brand’s holistic marketing and media strategy. In a world of new media and technology, it’s great to see New Zealand’s leading free-to-air and pay TV players have come together to educate the industry on the effectiveness and evolution of traditional media - TV. The industry looks forward to hearing from Think TV regularly and finding out how we can continually challenge ourselves and our clients to use it in new, and interesting, ways to deliver strong, long-term business results.”

    2018 Beacon Awards in association with NZME - Finalists announced!

    Posted 26 March 2018.

    Congratulations to the finalists of The 2018 Beacon Awards in association with NZME!

    View the full list here.

    ​​We look forward to you joining us at the 2018 Beacon Awards in association with NZME to find out if your finalist entry takes out any metal.

    THE BEACON AWARDS GALA DINNER:

    Date: Thursday 10th May 2018

    Time: 6.30pm drinks, 7.30pm show starts

    Cost:

    Comms Council Members & Sponsors Single Ticket: $265 + GST

    Comms Council Members & Sponsors Table of 10: $2,500 + GST

    Non-Member Single Ticket: $335 + GST

    Non-Member Table of 10: $3,200 + GST

    2018 Beacon Awards in Association with NZME - Gala Dinner

    Posted 26 March 2018.

    TICKETS ARE NOW SOLD OUT

    Find out who shines the brightest at the Beacon Awards in association with NZME. gala dinner.

    Date: Thursday 10th May, 2018

    Time: 6.30pm drinks, 7.30pm show starts

    Location: Viaduct Event Centre, 161 Halsey Street, Auckland

    Any queries, please email awards@commscouncil.nz

    For tickets, contact: office@commscouncil.nz

    Comms Council appoints new Media Committee Chair

    Posted 22 March 2018.

    ​​The Comms Council is pleased to announce the appointment of Samantha Osborne; Managing Director, Mindshare to the position of Chair for the Media Committee.

    For the past 5 years, Samantha has sat on the Media Committee and contributed to a number of strategic projects in that time which have benefited the industry.

    Samantha has lead the Mindshare New Zealand business since its launch in January 2015. She has been instrumental growing the agency from the ground up with a true entrepreneurial and start up mentality. Her drive and passion to develop a world class agency in the New Zealand market is evident in all that she does.

    With 20 years in advertising and media, Samantha has worked extensively in both the New Zealand market and the UK where she worked in a Worldwide team across many markets.

    Samantha will bring a range of perspectives to the position of Chair, having worked on both agency and media owner side, starting at TVNZ. Since then she has worked at Universal McCann, PHD, Ogilvy and Mather and ZenithOptimedia Worldwide, based in London.

    “We’re delighted to be able to announce Sam’s appointment as Chair. The media landscape is evolving rapidly and I’m looking forward to working with her as the Media Committee endeavours to navigate the changing world”, said Paul Head, CEO Comms Council.

    Samantha replaces Louise Bond; CEO, PHD who has been Chair since 2015.

    Paul Head thanked Louise for her significant contribution as Chair, saying, “Louise has done an amazing job chairing the Media Committee over the past few years and her leadership and guidance of the group has made a genuine difference for our members”.

    Marketing’s Inconvenient Truth

    Posted 22 March 2018.

    By Paul Head, CEO Commercial Communications Council

    I’ve been thinking a lot about climate change lately. For the record, I’m a believer. Mankind is responsible for global warming and we’re putting our future at risk. We’ve ignored the science for too long. As Al Gore said, it’s an inconvenient truth.

    What’s that got to do with marketing, you ask? In my view, as a profession we too often ignore the science. And that’s doing irreparable damage to the ecosystem we’re responsible for: specifically, our brands and their value to the businesses we work in. And we’re doing this through placing too much focus on the short-term.

    That’s not surprising, given how quickly technology is evolving and the rapid change this is driving for all of us. It’s bloody hard to be a marketer these days, whether you work in a marketing organisation or an agency.

    But I’d like to pose what I think is the fundamental marketing question we need to ask ourselves for 2018 and beyond: “How do we think about our business? Short-term or long-term?” Of course, everyone will answer “long-term”. But the marketing evidence doesn’t support that, either in New Zealand or internationally.

    As a marketing community we’ve become very focused on data driven short-term sales activation to drive business results. And this is problematic at the very least.

    We’re seeing evidence of this in entries to major effectiveness awards programmes around the world. In the UK, the IPA Effectiveness Awards have seen short-term campaign entries (campaigns of less than six months) go from less than 10% of entries a decade ago to almost 50% in 2017. Entries to the Effie Awards In New Zealand show a similar trend, as they do in other Effie programmes around the world. These short-term campaigns tend to be highly targeted, data driven, digital in nature and activation focused.

    The unfortunate corollary of this trend is that at exactly the same time that we’ve become obsessed with short-termism, work by marketing expert Peter Field and others proves conclusively that marketing effectiveness has actually declined and that this is directly linked to the short-term focus. Clearly, as a marketing community, we’ve got something wrong.

    But some clients are starting to rethink their focus as a result of their own experiences and the latest evidence from industry experts such as Peter Field and Mark Ritson.

    Procter & Gamble’s CMO Marc Pritchard admitted publicly that: “We targeted too much and we went too narrow”. The result was a significant hit to P&G’s top and bottom lines. They’ve since shifted the balance back to a more brand-focused strategy (whilst continuing to do lots of activation) and are seeing the results.

    Conversely, a brand like John Lewis in the UK has had a very strong brand-led strategy for the last decade, albeit underpinned by a strong retail activation component. But it’s the brand campaigns that have driven brand fame, emotional engagement, market share and profit growth for them. Their market share has gone from just over 22% in 2008 at the start of their current brand-led approach to just under 30% in 2016. That’s billions of pounds worth of incremental sales and profit in a tough retail environment and a prevailing wisdom that department stores are dead.

    The body of evidence from Peter Field, Mark Ritson, Byron Sharp and others, that ironically has been enabled in part by big data, is compelling. To ignore the science is akin to denying climate change, which has its own significant body of evidence attesting to its effects. And in the case of marketing, the evidence says that the things we do to generate short-term success are almost the opposite of the things we need to do to drive long-term brand success and business profitability.

    So, if we choose to acknowledge the new science that shows our short-term focus is creating marketing climate change and actually destroying value, we need to start doing things differently; we need to have the important conversations internally about long-term brand building and investment; we need to build enduring brands that deliver increased profit and we need to be braver in the face of compelling science.

    It’s an inconvenient truth, I know.

    The MAChINE™ Workshop - Dr Wayne Lotherington

    Posted 20 March 2018.

    If you are interested in this, or any of our courses, please contact your manager.

    FULLY BOOKED

    The MAChINE

    An agency in Singapore calculated that approximately 35% of the Creative Department’s time was spent on re-working the creative after their initial idea was rejected by the client. And that’s without counting the time of Planners and Suits, the effects on the quality of work approved or the impact on the motivation of the team. So imagine the value of selling your creative first time around.

    The MAChINE has been one of Wayne’s most popular and effective courses for anyone who has to sell creative plans and ideas to their client.

    His two day course offers not only content but the process of deconstructing an actual piece of work and using the ‘tools’ he provides to build the solutions and the confidence to deliver the creative work to the client.

    The MAChINE works

    When faced with the creative product, clients tend to focus on the ‘WHY NOT’ to approve as they are afraid of making a mistake.
    Wayne’s methodology shows agency people exactly what to say (and what not to say) in order to overcome that fear. The MAChINE helps clients recognise WHY the creative does the job for them. It reduces subjectivity and gives sound business reasons to approve the work. In doing so it forces attention on the Idea rather than the Execution.

    Imagine the benefits to selling your work first time around…

    • Better creative work will be approved, helping the clients’ business and your reputation
    • More satisfaction for your staff when their best ideas are sold
    • Cost savings, because you reduce the amount of re-work. This alone will save you the cost of the workshop when you sell just one campaign that would otherwise have been rejected.

    Target Audience

    Recommended for those who sell communication concepts or marketing ideas, including Account Management, Creative and Media people with a minimum of 2 years’ experience.

    What people have said after attending:

    • Thank you so much, learnt a lot from your techniques but also your personal style of public speaking. Steph
    • Absolutely loved it, even from a media background, it was great to be able to see the creative process. Ashleigh
    • Ridiculously accurate insight into persuasion. Nick
    • Enlightening, inspiring and very memorable. Dan
    • Stimulating, illuminating, practical, a shake-up! Jamie
    • The best course I have ever attended! Mark and Viv


    COURSE DETAILS

    Dates:

    Monday 11th & Tuesday 12th June

    Time: 8.30am - 5.00pm

    Venue: World Champions Room, Heritage Hotel, 35 Hobson Street

    Course materials, refreshments and lunch included for both days.


    Cost:

    Comms Council members: $1500 + GST

    Non-members: $2300 + GST

    Register your interest by emailing kate@commscouncil.nz

    Please provide full name, position, and contact details of attendees- and advise any special dietary requirements

    Full details available from Marlen Smith – Comms Council Industry Development Manager marlen@commscouncil.nz
    Phone 09 303 0435

    Comms Council Terms & Conditions apply.

    Opening the door to diversity

    Posted 14 March 2018.

    By Kim Pick, Creative Director Colenso BBDO.

    ​In March, when New Zealand snaps a national selfie with the five-yearly Census, we’ll get an official picture of what our society looks like today. And we’ll be able to see how Adland compares.

    New Zealand, we know, will be more diverse than ever. Especially in Auckland, which is already noted as one of the world’s most culturally diverse cities, with more than 200 ethnic groups, 160 languages and almost 50% of the population non-European.

    Adland, even though much of it is centred in that same city, looks a bit different.

    Last year, when the Commercial Communications Council (CCC) held a diversity and inclusiveness survey to better understand the industry, it showed that it was predominantly European/Pakeha: 87% overall and overwhelmingly so in senior leadership. Although 90% of those surveyed saw diversity as a benefit to the workplace.

    Despite being one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups, people of Asian ethnicity accounted for 10% of those surveyed. Pasifika people represented just 3% (versus 6% of the working age population), while Māori were the most under-represented, accounting for 4% versus 13% in the working age population.

    And while women made up the majority in terms of numbers overall, they were in the minority when it came to management and creative departments, where very few women hold senior leadership positions.

    The benefits of diversity – gender, cultural, ethnic, age and socio-economic diversity – are well-documented and include delivering creative advantage, greater innovation, improved decision-making and higher commercial returns. Diverse teams have been shown to discover problems faster, and their solutions are ultimately found to be of higher quality, more innovative and unexpected.

    As an industry that’s in the business of creating breakthrough, business-transforming ideas, we miss out on a wealth of fresh thinking and innovative, creative talent when we draw from the same homogenous pool.

    What’s more, failure to develop deep-seated cultural intelligence in our organisations makes us vulnerable to knowledge gaps and cultural blind spots, and we risk becoming disconnected from the very New Zealanders our brands are looking to connect and communicate with.

    In advertising and communications industries across the world, similar concerns are echoed. In the US, Nancy Hill, former CEO of the 4As said: “We are an industry that both influences and is influenced by the culture of our society. Simply reflecting one ethnic group isn’t good enough.”

    D&AD CEO Tim Lindsay, speaking to the Rare Sydney diversity masterclass in November, agreed: “As our business becomes more homogenised… we serve our clients less well and produce more homogenised thinking and solutions. So, for the future of the business, we all have to do something to put this right.”

    ‘Putting this right’ won’t happen overnight, especially in an industry experiencing accelerated cultural and technological change, and under pressure from compressed budgets and deadlines and increased working hours. “We’re working twice as hard for half the money and the pressure is really on,” says Lindsay. “Which makes changing the rules, making the space, creating the impetus for change that much more challenging… (but) it makes getting this right even more important.”

    Change is underway. The CCC, discovering that less than a quarter of the people surveyed were aware of diversity policies or programmes in their own organisation, has now set a target for all its members to have a best-practice, action-based and measurable diversity and inclusion policy in place by the end of 2018. It is engaging industry HR leaders and providing practical support through workshops to help achieve this.

    It’s also focused on developing a more diverse talent pool by fostering alternative pathways into the industry and engaging at high school as well as tertiary level.

    At Clemenger Group, a programme introduced two years ago focusing on gender diversity has seen positive results. A target of at least 40% women in senior management positions by 2020 has been exceeded early. Flexible working practices are being trialled, increased parental leave benefits offered and training rolled out to maintain momentum. But there is still work to do and the focus has widened to include diversity in all its forms and how to address more of the lopsided demographics.

    The New Zealand communications industry, already highly competitive on the global stage, can only be better for the creative and innovative advantage this can bring.

    Let’s hope our next selfie gives us reason to smile.

    Kim Pick is a member of the CCC Diversity and Inclusiveness Council, as well as the Clemenger Group diversity panel.

    Axis International Judges - Their Say on this Years Work

    Posted 12 March 2018.

    ​​Our two International Judges, Scott Nowell (The Monkeys, Sydney) and Duncan Marshall (Droga5, New York), sat down with TVNZ to talk about this years work, and what they thought of it.

    Check out the videos below to see what they had to say.

    Axis International Judges - Their Say on this Years Work

    Posted 12 March 2018.

    2018 Axis Awards Lifetime Achievement Award

    Posted 9 March 2018.

    ​Congratulations to Nick Worthington, the winner of the 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award sponsored by TOYBOX. Nick Worthington was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award for his incredible, creative career in the advertising industry.

    2018 Axis Awards Winners

    Posted 8 March 2018.

    Congratulations to all the winners of the 2018 Axis Awards!

    At the packed-out historical Shed 10, emceed by the rocking Mikey Havoc, 700 advertising and film types came together to celebrate the industry’s best creative work from the past year. Here are the very worthy winners

    Download the the full list of winners here.

    Major Awards:

    Grand Axis: Ogilvy & Mather - NZ Police - The Most Successful Recruitment Video

    Brand Axis: Clemenger BBDO & NZTA

    Agency of the Year: Colenso BBDO

    Production Company of the Year: Assembly

    Client of the Year: Fonterra Brands NZ

    Recognition Awards:

    Axis Student Challenge: Jay Kim & Malik Ben Brahim, Media Design School

    Emerging Talent: Sarsha Drakeford & Geordie Wilson

    Lifetime Achievement: Nick Worthington

    Thanks to our commercial partners TVNZ and NZME and our sponsors; Bauer, Adshel, The Radio Bureau, The Sweet Shop, Getty Images, Toybox, Marsden Inch, Google, Smile Dealers, Soar Print and Z Card.

    Grand Axis Winners
    Grand Axis Winners

    Lifetime Achievement Winner
    Lifetime Achievement Winner

    Agency of the Year Winners
    Agency of the Year Winners

    2018 Axis Awards Gala Dinner - TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW

    Posted 18 February 2018.

    TICKETS ON SALE NOW - BUY THEM HERE

    The Comms Council Axis awards recognise creative excellence in New Zealand. New Zealand may be a small geographically isolated country, but our advertising creative is world class - and we have to respect the best.

    2018 Axis Awards Gala Dinner BUY YOUR TICKETS HERE

    Date: Thursday 8th March, 2018

    Venue: Shed 10, 89 Quay St, Queen’s Wharf

    Time: 6.30pm-Midnight

    Cost:

    • Comms Council Members & Sponsors / Freelancers / Production Companies | Single Ticket = $240+GST
    • Comms Council Members & Sponsors / Freelancers / Production Companies | Table of 10 = $2,250.00+GST
    • Non-Members | Single Ticket = $305+GST
    • Non-Members | Table of 10 = $2,950.00+GST

    Tickets will be sent by Comms Council on Monday 5th March 2018. Any questions can be directed to awards@commscouncil.nz

    Sandy Smith ‘Inspiring Individual’ Award sponsored by MediaWorks

    Posted 13 February 2018.

    ​Entries due Thursday 29th March 4:00pm

    Inspiring Individual Award In Honour of Sandy Smith from MediaWorks NZ on Vimeo.

    Who was Sandy Smith?

    A woman you would warm to immediately, who was universally liked by people from all walks of life.

    More than that, when it came to media, she earned the respect of everyone she encountered, through an inclusive style, a sassy attitude and just all round good smarts.

    She was a woman who gave back, a woman who had time for everyone, a woman who would impart her knowledge to the budding stars of our industry – so in return, in her memory MediaWorks would like to give back.

    So who is the Inspiring Individual?

    The “unsung hero” in the company; the person who others find utterly inspiring with their generosity of spirit, their patience, their willingness and eagerness to be involved. The person integral to the company culture and passionate about contributing to the company’s success.

    Criteria

    A peer based award, it should recognise someone who is giving of their time, consistently smart in their thinking, has the ability to get the job done no matter what the circumstances. They are peer reviewed as an “inspiring individual”.

    The definition of this refers to their overall work demeanour – in that they are inclusive of their work colleagues and clients. But more than that, it should talk to the fact that anyone, from any walk of life would recognise them as an “inspiring individual”.

    As we respond to the ever changing media landscape, the industry needs people who will inspire others to rise to the challenge of the myriad opportunities available, messaging and platforms, to engage with consumers. This award recognises someone who encompasses this philosophy.

    This person is never too busy to impart their wisdom and guidance to someone who needs it. They are a mentor, a coach, a friend and a role model to all around them. The winner will receive $10,000 from Mediaworks to further their education, such as attending an international media festival or seminar – an opportunity to gain further experience and knowledge to be shared.

    Click here to download the information sheet and nomination form

    2018 Comms Council Media Agency of the Year

    Posted 5 February 2018.

    ​​Media Agency of the Year is an entered category in the annual Beacons Awards and is awarded to the Comms Council member agency whose business has made the greatest overall improvements to their business over the past (calendar) year. Entry is open to any Comms Council member media agency of any size.

    The winner is chosen by a panel of independent judges to include a range of prominent business people from outside the industry. ​

    Entries will be open from Monday 5th February with a closing date of 4pm 22nd March 2018.

    ​ENTRY FEE: $400 + GST

    SUBMIT ENTRIES TO: natasha@commscouncil.nz

    Download the Media Agency of the Year entry form here.

    New Course: Developing and Upskilling Account Managers - COURSE FULL

    Posted 31 January 2018.

    ​FROM GOOD TO GREAT

    The Comms Council in conjunction with Sarah Ritchie, founder of AM-Insider, are introducing a one day Account Management interactive workshop.

    ​The aim is to further develop Account Managers to work more effectively and confidently with clients.

    Content includes case studies, discussions, and task orientated activities for tangible take outs.

    Satisfied clients benefit both sides and ensures long term business and ROI. This course will enhance your skills and confidence to successfully manage your client accounts.

    We will explore:

     How to effectively manage client relationships

     Client retention

     Problem solving and project management

     Tackling the brief

     Proactive vs reactive

     Understanding your client’s business challenges

     Handling rough patches

     Taking responsibility

    Who is this for?

    Anyone at mid-level management responsible for client facing activity – this includes Advertising, Design, PR, Media, Digital, Experiential disciplines.

    Elevate your skill set and book now!

    Who is Sarah Ritchie?








    Founder of AM-Insider.com - for agency account managers

    Business Advisor and Consultant

    Author, “How to Wrestle an Octopus: an agency account manager’s guide to pretty much everything” (Publication date: May 2018)

    Sarah has been immersed in the advertising and design world for over 25 years, including 10 years as Director of Firestorm Design; a key presenter at the annual AUT Suit Camp; a teacher at Media Design School; Business Mentor with the Auckland Chamber of Commerce; and a long tenure in advertising and design account management.

    These days Sarah focuses on business and people growth, as a business advisor/consultant, teacher, coach, writer, and Founder of AM-Insider.com

    She created AM-Insider, in 2014, to address the gaps which exist in the professional development of account managers, and to support their resourcing and training. The aim of AM-Insider is to strengthen agencies, and to enthuse, empower, and educate account management professionals right across our industry (advertising, design, PR, media, experiential, and print).

    Sarah has worked with some of New Zealand’s leading brands in many different industries, across varied channels and with lots of different clients. Armed with all this knowledge and experience, we are delighted that Sarah is joining us to give this one-day seminar. With her engaging style we know that attendees will leave with knowledge to help them in their roles and with their client relationships.

    With no end to her talents, Sarah has also written “How to Wrestle an Octopus: an agency account manager’s guide to pretty much everything”. This is a unique professional development resource and an essential training tool for a global agency audience. The book will be available February 2018.

    Details:

    Date: Wednesday 28th March

    Time: 8:45am - 5pm

    Venue: Kensington Swan, 18 Viaduct Harbour, KPMG Building, Auckland 1010

    Price:

    $495.00 + GST for Comms Council Members

    Or $895.00 + GST for Non-Members

    To register:

    Kate Cronin-Smith

    Comms Council Events Coordinator

    Email: kate@commscouncil.nz

    Please advise any special dietary requirements

    Further information from Marlen Smith, Industry Development Manager – 021 272 9998



    See Comms Council Terms & Conditions here.

    The Things You Must Know About Employment Law in 2018

    Posted 30 January 2018.

    ​The Comms Council is pleased to offer an employment seminar presented by Anthony Drake - Partner Wynn Williams and trusted advisor to the communications industry.

    Anthony will address the important issues around employment law since the change of government, including proposed changes that may affect your business.

    ​CONTENT

    Proposed new employment laws: The new Government has proposed a number of employment law changes which affect all business. The changes will affect: Trial periods; equal pay; minimum wages; increase in contractor rights; paid parental leave; Fair pay agreements; reinstatement; introduction of statutory redundancy compensation; and increased scope for minimum standards.

    The right to disconnect: Modern workplace devices and practices increasingly require employees to be ‘connected’. What does this mean in relation to health and safety obligations and what are other countries doing?

    #MeToo - The Weinstein effect: What are employer obligations when an incident becomes known and there is no formal complaint. Can a complainant make a ‘confidential’ or ‘off the record’ complaint?

    WHO SHOULD ATTEND

    All senior Agency and Marketing Management, HR Managers, Talent & Development Managers, Business Managers, Mid-level to Senior Suits.p>


    DETAILS

    Date: Thursday 1st March

    Time: 7:30am for 8am start, ends 9am

    Venue: Saatchi & Saatchi, Level 3, 123-125 The Strand, Parnell

    Cost: $85 + GST for Comms Council and ANZA members / $120 + GST for non-members


    Paid parking is in the vicinity - we advise taxi or Uber


    TO REGISTER

    Please provide full name, position, and contact details of attendees- and advise any special dietary requirements.

    Kate Cronin-Smith

    Comms Council Events Coordinator

    Email: kate@commscouncil.nz

    M: 022 176 2997

    P: 09 303 0435

    See Comms Council Terms & Conditions here.

    European Union New Data Laws 2018

    Posted 22 January 2018.

    Is your organisation subject to the EU’s new data laws?

    ​In May 2018 the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation 2018 (GDPR) will come into force. It has been introduced to:

    • better protect all EU citizens from privacy and data breaches

    • ensure organisations have appropriate processes and procedures in place to manage data privacy

    Fines for non-compliance can be up to 4% of global turnover or 20 million Euros.

    ​​Why is this important to New Zealand organisations?

    The GDPR applies to all organisations (inside and outside the EU) processing the personal data of EU citizens, no matter where they are living.

    Personal data includes any information related to a person that can be used to directly or indirectly identify that person, and includes photos, email addresses, bank details, social media posts, and IP addresses.

    New Zealand organisations impacted by the new regime may need to revisit their current data and privacy policies and processes.


    Resources

    See here for the main elements of the GDPR as they apply to businesses located outside of the EU.

    Whilst it’s unlikely many local agencies will be directly affected, there will be many client organisations that are doing business in the EU and it is useful if agencies therefore have an understanding of the new constraints. In addition, it’s fair to say that the GDPR has been a major focus for agencies across Europe to ensure their systems and processes are compliant.

    Is your organisation subject to the EU’s new data laws?

    Posted 22 January 2018.

    ​In May 2018 the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation 2018 (GDPR) will come into force. It has been introduced to:

    • better protect all EU citizens from privacy and data breaches

    • ensure organisations have appropriate processes and procedures in place to manage data privacy

    Fines for non-compliance can be up to 4% of global turnover or 20 million Euros.

    ​Why is this important to New Zealand organisations?

    The GDPR applies to all organisations (inside and outside the EU) processing the personal data of EU citizens, no matter where they are living.

    Personal data includes any information related to a person that can be used to directly or indirectly identify that person, and includes photos, email addresses, bank details, social media posts, and IP addresses.

    New Zealand organisations impacted by the new regime may need to revisit their current data and privacy policies and processes.

    Resources

    See here for the main elements of the GDPR as they apply to businesses located outside of the EU.

    Whilst it’s unlikely many local agencies will be directly affected, there will be many client organisations that are doing business in the EU and it is useful if agencies therefore have an understanding of the new constraints. In addition, it’s fair to say that the GDPR has been a major focus for agencies across Europe to ensure their systems and processes are compliant.

    Little Giant

    Posted 17 January 2018.

    2018 Axis Speaks - Sponsored by Getty Images

    Posted 10 January 2018.

    TICKETS ON SALE NOW - PURCHASE HERE

    Introducing the creative event of the year, before the other creative event of the year.

    Come and glean from the Axis 2018 International Judges as they share their wisdom. Followed by a Q&A with the Axis Executive Judges and this year’s convenor.

    Thanks to Getty Images

    This year’s AXIS theme is ‘Respect’, and these ad industry giants have certainly earnt it!

    Read more on them here.

    Duncan Marshall, Creative Partner, Droga5 New York

    Duncan has worked in the advertising industry for over 25 years in London, Sydney, Los Angeles and New York City. He is a founding partner of Droga5.

    Scott Nowell, Chief Creative Officer & Co-Founder, The Monkeys Sydney

    In 2012 Scott, Mark and Justin also started a design company Maud along with David Park. In ten short years they’ve grown from three founders to over 120+ employees and won over 200 creative awards at every major award show.

    Convenor:

    Brigid Alkema, Clemenger BBDO

    Executive Judges:

    Chris Schofield, Shine

    Levi Slavin, Colenso BBDO

    Lisa Fedyszyn, Ogilvy & Mather

    Damon Stapleton, DDB

    DETAILS

    When: Thursday 1st March 2018

    Time: 5.30pm-8.00pm

    Where: Bluestone Room

    Cost:

    Comms Council Members, freelancers, production companies: $60 + GST

    Non-Comms Council Members: $120 + GST

    Tickets include canapes and drinks on arrival.


    PURCHASE TICKETS

    Beacon Awards 2018 Entry Writing Workshop - DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION

    Posted 20 December 2017.

    Your work dazzles, now make sure your entry does too.

    Click here to download the presentation

    How to create an award winning entry …

    This workshop will be facilitated by Andrew Reinholds, OMD and Simon Bird, PHD.

    Date: Tuesday 23rd January 2017

    Venue: NZME, 2 Graham Street, Auckland

    Time: 9.00 am – 10.30 am

    Cost: $30 + GST per person (members)

    $60 + GST per person (non-members)

    BOOKING CLOSED

    Announcing Axis 2018 International Judges

    Posted 7 December 2017.

    Scott Nowell, Chief Creative Officer & Co-Founder, The Monkeys

    ​Scott started The Monkeys with Mark Green and Justin Drape in June 2006.

    In 2012 Scott, Mark and Justin also started design company Maud along with David Park. In ten short years they’ve grown from three founders to over 120+ employees.

    Scott has judged numerous award shows including Cannes Lions, Clio, AWARD, MADC, Caxtons, Cannes Young Lions and has been a keynote speaker at the Caxtons, Semi-Permanent - the world’s biggest design conference - and AWARD.
    The Monkeys have won over 200 creative awards at every major award show.

    Scott has written and directed award winning short films, documentaries, web and television series, including teaming with Andrew Denton’s Zapruder’s Other Films to create, write and produce the critically acclaimed comedy drama :30 Seconds, nominated in the 2010 Logies, the AFI Awards and The Australian Writers Guild Awards. Scott has written and produced long-form brand-funded content for major brands such as Telstra and Ubank, and script edited and produced the ABC Documentary Art Irritates Life on the story of cult art movement and surf brand Mambo.

    Scott is an integral part of the The Monkeys’ success, having helped Australia’s biggest brands grow and succeed with campaigns for the likes of Telstra, Parmalat, Ubank, IGA, Ice Break, Oak, Blackmores and award-winning campaigns for MLA’s Australia Day and diversity work.

    Whilst still only 10 years old, The Monkeys have captured the imagination of the Australian advertising industry. In 2016 they were named Effective Agency of the Year at the Australian Effie Awards and they also picked up the coveted ‘Grand Effie’ for Meat & Livestock Australia’s ‘Operation Boomerang’. The same year they were named Creative Agency of the Year at the Campaign Asia Awards and B&T Advertising Agency of the Year.


    Duncan Marshall, Creative Partner Droga5Duncan has worked in the advertising industry for over 25 years in London, Sydney, Los Angeles and New York City. He is a founding partner of Droga5.

    Over the years he has enjoyed immersing himself in the world of businesses and organisations including Chase, UNICEF, Hennessy, BMW, The British Army, G.E., NSPCC, Toyota, Amnesty International, Puma, The United Nations, Under Armour, Ecko Unltd, and done a few things for Jay Z because, hey, it’s Jay Z.

    Duncan has been awarded at every major industry competition, notably three Titanium Lions over three consecutive years at the Cannes International Advertising Awards.

    He loves great work that works, and, beyond that, hiking and surfing wherever and whenever he can. He can also make the sound of an elevator button, a police siren, a Geiger counter and some early video games – so hit him up if you’re ever in a pinch in an audio-session.

    Beacon Awards 2018 in association with NZME - Call for Entries

    Posted 4 December 2017.

    Click here to download the Call for Entries Document

    ENTER HERE

    Call for Entry closes 4pm 21 February 2018

    Late Entry closes 4pm 23 February 2018

    The following Beacon Award categories are intended as a guide for your campaign submissions. The Beacon Awards Committee reserves the right to re-categorise campaigns and split/redefine categories if entries received in a particular category warrant such action.

    Across all categories, entries will need to demonstrate the development of a media solution to resolve a marketing problem by way of:

    • An entry summary (no score allocated)

    • The insight
    • The strategy
    • The execution
    • The results

    Each category also has its own specific requirements based on that category’s focus. Judges are instructed to evaluate entries against these requirements. Please ensure that your entry is tailored to address the specific requirements of the category it’s entered in and that the correct entry form is used.


    GENERAL CATEGORIES


    NOTE: A campaign can only be entered into one category A to E once, i.e. a campaign cannot, for example, be entered in Category C and Category D. Entries in Category F – Charity can only be entered into Category F. (Multiple category entries outside of categories A – E and F are welcome.)


    A. Social Marketing/Public Service

    This category recognises uses of media that have succeeded in meeting the objectives of government or publicly-funded bodies. Typically these include campaigns from government departments, local bodies, tertiary education institutions or for a community service. The judges will be looking for proof that the media strategy and execution has had an identifiable and direct contribution in achieving set campaign objectives.

    Download Category A Entry Form here.


    B. Retail/Etail
    This category recognises media campaigns in the area of retail/etail. This includes fashion, clothing, accessories and fast food and also incorporates online retail. The judges are looking for proof that the media strategy and execution has had a direct contribution in achieving set retail objectives and that success is not the result of pricing or sale activity.

    Download Category B Entry Form here.


    C. Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG)
    This category recognises media campaigns across the entire spectrum of FMCG. This can include food, grocery, household products, cosmetics, toiletries, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and pet. The judges will be looking for proof that the media strategy has had a direct contribution in achieving set campaign objectives.

    Download Category C Entry Form here.


    D. Consumer Durables
    This category recognises media campaigns that achieve success for products that are not purchased regularly or those that have high involvement decision making. This could include motor vehicles, white goods, brown goods, household furniture and electronic goods. The judges will be looking for proof that the media strategy and execution has had a direct contribution in achieving set campaign objectives.

    Download Category D Entry Form here.


    E. Consumer Services
    This category recognises media campaigns that achieve success for companies whose main focus is providing a service to a consumer. This could include airlines, tourism, energy suppliers, financial services, telecommunications and entertainment (TV, music, movies). The judges will be looking for proof that the media strategy and execution has had a direct contribution in helping achieve set campaign objectives.

    Download Category E Entry Form here.


    F. Charity
    Entries in this category cannot be entered in other categories

    This category is seeking to identify campaigns that make the greatest contribution to support charities, appeals, fundraising or various not-for-profit community programmes. The award may recognise innovation in media thinking but this is not mandatory. The judges will be looking for proof that the media strategy and execution has had a direct contribution in helping achieve set campaign objectives. This category is strictly for not-for-profit organisations only, entries from commercial brands or organisations are not eligible.

    Download Category F Entry Form here.


    G. Best Small Budget (up to $100k per annum)


    This category is open to any campaign with a total combined campaign cost to client of less than $100,000. All entries must prove they are a stand-alone campaign as opposed to a single execution within a larger campaign. The judges will be looking for entries that put the perceived budget constraints behind them to develop brilliant strategic thinking and outstanding activation to deliver results that punched way above the campaign’s weight.

    Download Category G Entry Form here.


    H. Best Use of Event/Activation/Sponsorship
    This category recognises entries that deliver outstanding experiential campaigns via guerrilla marketing, live events, shows, concerts & festivals, experiential events, large and small scale stunts. The event will be physical in its core, but can have virtual elements around it. Judges will be looking for evidence that the event/activation was the central component of the campaign, rather than campaigns with and event/activation component. They will also need to understand what the brand narrative was for people present at the event/activation and how the event/activation was leveraged was leveraged to deliver outstanding campaign results.

    Download Category H Entry Form here.


    I. Best Use of Content


    This category is looking for campaigns that have the use of content at their heart. By going beyond traditional advertising formats to seamlessly integrate into television programming, create branded music projects, use of native advertising such as sponsored stories, featured videos and messages via social media, the content should fit with the brand values, strategy and clearly address the marketing challenge.

    Entries will not be judged on the creative content itself, but on the strategic thinking that led to content being identified as the core communication vehicle. Judges will also be looking to understand how that content was leveraged and developed across paid, owned and earned channels to deliver outstanding campaign results.

    Download Category I Entry Form here.


    J. Best Use of Technology

    This category recognises the importance of technology in driving media innovation. Specifically where technology has driven the development, implementation and outcomes of a campaign or initiative that connected with a target audience. This could include existing technology solutions applied in an innovative way, or the development of proprietary technology solutions. Judges will be looking to understand how the use of technology was innovative or market leading for the client or category, why the technology solution was a good fit for the brand or business problem and how it impacted or connected with the target audience to help achieve business outcomes.

    Download Category J Entry Form here.


    K. Best Use of Mobile
    This category recognises innovative and effective use of the mobile channel. It covers any form of mobile media including mobile advertising, mobile apps, mobile communication (ie SMS), mobile technology (ie Beacon’s, QR codes, Bluetooth), or any other communication that requires a mobile device. Judges will be looking for campaign’s that demonstrate a clear mobile strategy, which identifies why mobile was an effective channel to achieve the client’s objectives, is brilliant in its execution, and delivers demonstrable results.

    Download Category K Entry Form here.


    L. Best Use of Data

    This category recognises media approaches that have been led by a sharp data strategy. Judges will be looking to understand how this leading data strategy drove the media approach, directly impacting on behavioural or business outcomes. Results are worth 35% as this data strategy should be able to attribute its success with proof points such as targeted response, increased engagement, incremental leads, reduction in CPA and/or improved ROI. Judges will also be looking to understand how the use of data was an agency led initiative. This category is not reliant on a specific marketing campaign (it could be a subset or always on) but will still need to contextualise for judges why this approach is award worthy.

    If your data source is proprietary research leading to an insight you may want to consider entering the Best Use of Insight category instead.

    Download Category L Entry Form here.


    M. Best Use of Video
    This category recognises innovative and effective use if video to engage with your target audience. It is not about the content per se, but the strategic approach to how the content was deployed and innovation in the use of technology that created the impact. Judges will also be looking at how the video activity met the campaign objectives and materially drive the commercial result. Campaigns may have appeared on social media platforms, the digital platforms of publishers & media brands, video networks or any other video platform (including TV).

    Download Category M Entry Form here.


    N. Best Use of Social
    This category recognises campaigns that use existing or emerging social platforms and/or social activity including blog, social networking sites and applications. Entries in thi category should use social as the primary channel and demonstrate creative use of social platforms as well as a sound understanding of digital consumer behaviour. Judges will be looking for campaigns that have literally put consumers at the heart to build powerful communication strategies. There will be clear rationale as to why social media was the right response to the clients brief and move beyond metrics of likes or shares to offer compelling proof of the effect social media had on delivering the campaign results.

    Download Category N Entry Form here.


    O. Creative Media Idea
    This category rewards invention or innovation within a channel or property that was driven by consumer, data or brand insight and creative thinking. Judges are looking for ideas that drive tangible benefit to the consumer or to the client’s communications objectives.

    Download Category O Entry Form here.


    P. Best Use of Insight
    This category recognises how the use of insight, analytics or market intelligence has resulted in media campaign and business success. Judges will look for entries that demonstrate how an agency has uncovered an insight, how this insight had shaped the media strategy development and execution and the business success that this has delivered. Sources of insight could vary from proprietary research, to social listening, through to quantitative or qualitative studies. The insight section of the entry will account for 40% of the judges score.

    Download Category P Entry Form here.


    Q. Best Communications Strategy (Note word limit 1,500)
    This category celebrates strategic excellence. Judges are looking for a cohesive communications strategy with a central idea at its heart. It should show a carefully researched and well thought-out action plan designed to meet a clearly defined challenge. This should include novel ways in which media channels have been used, each with a clear link to the strategic idea. The winning entry will also have clearly articulated the insights used to inspire the communications strategy. The strategy section of the entry will account for 40% of the judges score.

    Download Category Q Entry Form here.


    R. Most Effective
    This category recognises meeting a challenge and succeeding. Judges are looking for evidence that the communication drove a positive outcome or exceeded objectives. This could include generating positive business results (e.g. market share, sales value, profit), shifting brand health measures (e.g. consideration, preference, perceptions), or changing people’s behaviour (e.g. buying patterns or social habits). It will focus on effectiveness of a campaign above all other considerations – the results section of the entry will account for 40% of the judge’s score. All entries must include figures showing the campaign’s direct impact on stated objectives (indexes will suffice).

    Download Category R Entry Form here.


    S. Best Launch
    This category recognises brand, service or product launches or re-launches. To be eligible for a re-launch there must have been no significant activity for at least 36 months prior to re-launch. Judges will be looking to understand how the media thinking and launch media activity were key contributors to the campaign’s results and that those results are indeed outstanding within the entrant’s category.

    Download Category S Entry Form here.


    T. Best Collaboration
    This category is open to media owners and agencies and is designed to celebrate the work that is only made possible by the close collaboration of (1) one or more media owner/partner(s) AND (2) one or more media agency/ies and/or other relevant agencies. This category can be entered by either the media owner/partner or agency. The judges will be looking for demonstration of how collaboration has enhanced the result for the client. Entries could be proactive sales proposals or responses to briefs as long as the partners have worked together to execute and enhance.

    Download Category T Entry Form here.


    U. Sustained Success (Note word limit 1,500)

    This category recognises communications and media thinking that has significantly contributed to the overall success of a campaign that has been consistently in market across three years from 1st January 2013. Judges will be looking for demonstration of strategic thinking and how it has ensured the campaign has remained consistent but also up-to-date and relevant. The effectiveness and results achieved should accurately reflect the objectives and media strategy. The judges want to see clarity of thinking, identification and application of insights and innovation. It’s important to remember that a campaign founded on a sound, solid and evolving strategy can be as effective as one containing significant innovation.

    Download Category U Entry Form here.


    V. Media Business of the Year - Entries due 4pm 15 March
    This category recognises the year’s outstanding Media Business. The judges (Comms Council Media Committee) will be looking for the business that has set a clear vision and strategy and then implemented that strategy with success. In this case success will be assessed from a range of perspectives including financial, industry engagement and reputation, audience growth and/or engagement. The Comms Council Media Committee reserves the right to not award in this category if no entry meets the judging standard.

    Completed entry forms for this category must be sent to awards@commscouncil.nz

    Download Category V Entry Form here.


    W. Sales Person/Sales Team of the Year - Entries due 4pm 15 March

    This category recognises excellence within the crucial media owners’ sales function. Open to both individual or team entries. Judges will be looking for evidence of a clear strategic roadmap that allowed for the delivery of outstanding business performance against well-defined KPIs. Examples of innovative campaign case studies and a solution based approach to selling are more likely to resonate with the judges.

    Completed entry forms for this category must be sent to Natasha Galloway at awards@commscouncil.nz

    Download Category W Entry Form here.

    Download the Judging Form here.

    SPECIAL AWARDS

    Advertiser of the Year
    The award will be given to the Advertiser that is the most outstanding performer on the night of the Beacon Awards Ceremony. The award is based on the weighted value of Gold and Silver Beacon Awards won by the Advertiser. 10 points are awarded for Gold and 5 for Silver. A finalist earns 2 points. Points are calculated and the winner is identified.

    Please note: Points will only be awarded for the highest award received. Therefore points for a gold or silver award will not also receive finalist points. Best in Show does not earn points and is not included in the count.


    Media Agency of the Year - Entries due 4pm 22 March
    The award will be given to the Comms Council Agency whose business has made the greatest overall improvements to their business over the past year. It is open to Comms Council member media agencies of any size.

    Entries will be open from Thursday 1 February 2018 with a closing date of 4pm 22nd March 2018. The winner will be chosen by a panel of independent judges to include a range of prominent business people from outside the industry.

    Click here to download the entry form


    Sandy Smith Inspiring Individual Award - Entries due 4pm 15 March

    The “unsung hero” in the company; the person who others find utterly inspiring with their generosity of spirit, their patience, their willingness and eagerness to be involved. The person integral to the company culture and passionate about contributing to the company’s success.


    Best in Show
    All Gold Beacon Award winners will be eligible for the Best in Show. This award is selected by the panel of international judges.

    Augusto

    Posted 28 November 2017.

    The Magic of the Millennial

    Posted 27 November 2017.

    ​By Harriette Hanson, Senior Account Manager, J. Walter Thompson

    ​Millennials (those born between 1980 and 2000), and specifically millennials in the workforce, are an ongoing topic of contention. Being labelled a ‘millennial’ has earned negative connotations, with the stereotype of being entitled, shallow and self-seeking. A millennial myself, I’m puzzled, because when I look around our agency, in which many of the staff fall into this group, I can’t help but notice my millennial peers are quite the opposite.

    The younger members of our particular agency, and the wider advertising and communications industry, in all honesty, are troopers at work. Granted, we’re at a unique time in our lives where we can be a little bit decadent and can focus on ourselves: we’re earning a steady income and many of us are yet to experience life’s major responsibilities of mortgages or children. Because of this, we can head into the office early (no school drop-offs for us!), we can sustain a 12-hour day and we can stay late without the guilt of not being home to cook dinner for the tribe.

    Although the ‘millennial’ label may carry negative associations, ironically, in our industry, it is also a term that crops up increasingly in campaign and brand strategies for clients. For the very reasons I’ve outlined above, millennials are a desirable audience for businesses because of their disposable income and limited responsibilities; but their rapidly shifting brand loyalties and wariness of being ‘sold’ to can make them tricky to engage.

    That’s where the new advertising and communications generation has so much to offer. What we can bring to the table at a time when so many advertisers are chasing the millennial market, is of great benefit. The Commercial Communications Council has recognised the importance of encouraging the next generation, and in doing so future-proofing the industry, and established the First Five Rungs (FFR) team, which I am proud to chair.

    The FFR comprises 10 millennial members, with the aim of inspiring and engaging young members of the advertising and communications industry in the first five years of their new career. We’re here for them because we remember exactly how it felt to step into our first advertising agency and to be so out of our depth in that hectic new world. From ‘Newbie Packs’ to networking events featuring inspirational speakers, the FFR aims to ensure new graduates feel welcomed, inspired and motivated for a long career. We’re also actively involved in the recruitment process, alongside the Comms Council, to ensure a high calibre of newbies entering the industry.

    Agencies and clients benefit from hiring millennial talent as they bring a fresh perspective to their work and clients’ businesses. For clients, having an agency team with millennials in the mix is akin to having insider information. Brands today often struggle to understand younger audiences and to target them correctly – our generation is that audience, so who better to help than them? The new generation of agency faces can tap into personal insights, help to craft an authentic and engaging voice for the brand and act as the filters of this audience. After all, they know themselves better than anyone else.

    As we prepare for 2018, the FFR will increase its work alongside those new to the industry and will put all those who turned the term “millennial” into a negative word to shame, as we continue to show the value of young minds in the industry and future-proof “ad-land” by supporting the next generation.

    Axis 2018 - Call for Entry Open Now

    Posted 6 November 2017.

    DOWNLOAD the Category Information

    ENTRIES ARE NOW CLOSED. Some special awards categories are still open. See above Category Information for details.

    Click here for more info on our ​International Judges, Duncan Marshall, Creative Partner Droga5, and Scott Nowell, Chief Creative Officer and Founder The Monkeys, Sydney.

    Convener of Judges for 2018, Brigid Alkema, Executive Creative Director of Clemenger BBDO NZ, says the theme of this year’s awards is ‘Respect’.

    “Every year Axis celebrates what our industry has achieved in the last 365 days. The work that was made and the great minds that rallied together around a relentless belief in the power of creativity. The truly great work we do moves people and business. This work is rare, it’s brave, it’s dignified, it’s powerful. It deserves our respect. That’s what we’ll be showing at Axis 2018,” says Alkema.

    Brigid Alkema is joined by Special Group Managing Partner Michael Redwood as Chair, and on the Axis 2018 Jury, the local Presidents and Executive Judges are Chris Schofield (Executive Creative Director, Shine), Lisa Fedyszyn (Group Creative Director, Ogilvy), Levi Slavin (Chief Creative Officer, Colenso BBDO) and Damon Stapleton (Chief Creative Officer, DDB New Zealand).

    Entry categories for 2018 have been updated to better reflect increasing use of digital. Axis 2018 will also see the introduction of “The Brand Axis” award, recognising a New Zealand business or organisation that has been successfully building and evolving its brand for the last decade. This new award aligns with the industry focus on the importance of long term brand building as a driver of commercial or social success.

    Commercial Communications Council CEO, Paul Head, says Axis 2018 is about highlighting an increasingly crucial aspect of the industry’s work. “Commercial creativity is more important than ever before. Great ideas that engage consumers emotionally, make them look at their world differently and ultimately change behaviours are what our clients should be demanding from us. So, the craft of creativity, engaging and entertaining audiences and building brands must remain at the core of what we do as an industry. And that’s why Axis is so important; It celebrates the work that has innovated, inspired and engaged.”


    Axis Awards 2018 – Key Dates

    Call for Entries goes live: Thursday, 9th November 2017

    Entries close: Tuesday, 23rd January 2018 at 4pm

    Late entry deadline closes: Thursday, 25th January 2018 at 4pm

    Hard copy material deadline: Friday, 2nd February 2018

    Finalists announced: Wednesday, 21st February 2018

    Tickets on sale: Tuesday, 20th February 2018

    Axis Speaks: Thursday, 1st March 2018

    Awards Show: Thursday, 8th March 2018

    Widespread support for diversity but gaps in formal policies and programmes to drive better outcomes

    Posted 1 November 2017.

    - The Commercial Communications Council sets target for all members to have diversity policy and plan in place by the end of 2018 -

    ​Despite widespread support for diversity and inclusiveness in the advertising and communications industry, there is a gap when it comes to formal policies and programmes, according to research undertaken by The Commercial Communications Council.

    The voluntary survey of Comms Council members was undertaken to better understand the current state of diversity in the industry, provide a benchmark and identify where The Comms Council can take a leadership role and provide support to members.

    The survey found that more than nine out of ten respondents believe in the benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace. However, less than a quarter (24%) were aware of their organisation having any diversity policies, programmes or initiatives. This lack of awareness extends to senior levels, with half stating they had no formal policy, programme or initiatives relating to diversity and inclusion.

    “We know that our members want to do better in the area of diversity and inclusion, yet many aren’t sure about the best way to go about it. Like any area of business, if you want to do better you need to have a plan. Formal diversity policies and programmes provide a framework and help guide behaviours and measure outcomes,” said Paul Head, Comms Council CEO.

    In response to the survey, The Comms Council has identified three key objectives:

    1. Increasing awareness of the benefits of Diversity & Inclusiveness in the communications industry workplace through Board engagement, Diversity Works New Zealand engagement, awareness of training options and a 12-month communications plan;
    2. For every Comms Council member agency to have a D&I best practice policy in place by December 2018, through engagement with HR leaders and practical support through workshops;
    3. Assisting with the development of a more diverse talent pool through engagement at both high school and tertiary level.

    As a first step, The Comms Council will develop a Best-Practice Diversity & Inclusion Policy Guide for members to help turn support into action that encourages greater diversity within the industry.

    “We support a best-practice, action-based, measurable approach to D&I to effect positive change. We know that having a formal diversity policy or programme in place will not transform our industry overnight, but it’s an important first step. It shows that an organisation is serious about raising levels of diversity, is committed and is prepared to take action so that the agencies of the future more closely reflect the communities we are part of,” said Megan Clark, Comms Council Inclusiveness & Diversity Council Chair.

    “At a minimum we want all of our member agencies to have a formal diversity policy and plan in place by the end of 2018. We believe this is an important and achievable goal and are committed to supporting our members to make this happen,” she added.

    The Commercial Communications Council will be hosting a policy workshop for HR leaders and HR champions within agencies in the first quarter of 2018. This practical workshop will feature a guest speaker, outline the impact of diversity commercially, provide a suite of useful tools and suggest how to promote diversity and implement policies and tools to improve in this area.

    Summary of research findings

    • The majority (70%) of respondents felt that their place of work was diverse, yet perceptions of the diversity of their leadership team and the industry as a whole were much lower.
    • Of the CEOs and Managing Directors who participated in the survey, 63% were male, and 37% were female. Those in senior leadership roles were overwhelmingly of European ethnicity. About half the agencies surveyed had individuals of non-European ethnicity in their senior leadership teams; two had individuals of non-European ethnicity as Managing Director or CEO.
    • Gender splits varied significantly by discipline/department. Creative/design was the most male skewed 58% male/39%, HR/Admin was the most female skewed.
    • The advertising and communications agencies surveyed were significantly younger than the total working population as a whole; 61% were under 35 versus 27% in the total NZ working age population. Whereas 23% of the working age population is 50-64, only 6% of those sampled fell into this age group.
    • There are more of European ethnicity in the industry compared to the general working population (87% versus 73%). One in ten respondents were of Asian ethnicity (versus 13% of NZ working age population). Pasifika peoples accounted for 3% versus 6% of working age population, while Māori were the most under represented, accounting for 4% versus 13% in the working age population.
    • Proportions of LBGQT people within the industry mirrored those in the population as a whole, and similarly for different religious beliefs.
    • There appeared to be very low representation of people with disabilities or special needs with 1% of respondents having a disability or special need of some kind.


    “Feedback to the survey suggests that many are still thinking about diversity in terms of gender, but it’s broader than this. Truly diverse and inclusive leadership takes into account age, ethnicity and gender.”
    “This is more than a feel-good initiative. The benefits of achieving greater diversity for our people, industry and clients are irrefutable. Greater diversity provides access to broader talent delivering creative advantage, greater innovation, improved decision-making and higher commercial returns,” Paul Head, Comms Council CEO.

    Comms Council target for all members to have diversity policy and plan in place by the end of 2018

    Posted 31 October 2017.

    Thanks to all of our members who participated in the recent Diversity & Inclusion Survey. We were heartened by the response from members and the results have provided useful insights into the current state of diversity within the industry and a baseline to progress from.

    Widespread support, but lack of D&I policies & programmes in place

    The research highlights widespread support for diversity and inclusiveness, however there is a gap when it comes to formal policies and programmes. Nine out of ten respondents believe in the benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace. However, less than a quarter (24%) were aware of their organisation having any diversity policies, programmes or initiatives. This lack of awareness extends to senior levels, with half stating they had no formal policy, programme or initiatives relating to diversity and inclusion.

    In response to the survey, the Comms Council has identified three key objectives:

    1. Increase awareness of the benefits of Diversity & Inclusiveness in the communications industry workplace, through Board engagement, DWNZ engagement, awareness of training options and a 12-month communications plan;
    2. For every Comms Council member agency to have a D&I best practice policy in place by December 2018, through engagement with HR leaders and practical support through workshops;
    3. Assist with the development of a more diverse talent pool through engagement at both High School and Tertiary level

    We know that our members want to do better in the area of diversity and inclusion, yet many aren’t sure about the best way to go about it. Like any area of business, if you want to do better you need to have a plan. Formal diversity policies and programmes provide a framework and help guide behaviours and measure outcomes and that’s why The Comms Council is issuing the challenge for all member agencies to have a D&I best-practice policy in place by December 2018.

    We believe this is an important and achievable goal and are committed to supporting our members to make this happen. We support a best-practice, action-based, measurable approach to D&I to effect positive change.

    Comms Council’s best-practice D&I policy guide and policy workshop

    The Comms Council will develop a Best-Practice Diversity & Inclusion Policy Guide for members to help turn support into action that encourages greater diversity within the industry.

    We will also be hosting a policy workshop for HR leaders and HR champions within agencies in the first quarter of 2018. This practical workshop will feature a guest speaker, outline the impact of diversity commercially, provide a suite of useful tools and suggest how to promote diversity and implement policies and tools to improve in this area. If you are interested in this event, please pre-register your interest with Katie Ward at office@commscouncil.nz

    Summary of research findings

    Feedback suggests that many are thinking about diversity in terms of gender, but it’s broader than this. Truly diverse and inclusive leadership takes into account age, ethnicity and gender.

    • The majority (70%) of respondents felt that their place of work was diverse, yet perceptions of the diversity of their leadership team and the industry as a whole were much lower.
    • Of the CEOs and Managing Directors who participated in the survey, 63% were male, and 37% were female. Those in senior leadership roles were overwhelmingly of European ethnicity. About half the agencies surveyed had individuals of non-European ethnicity in their senior leadership teams; two had individuals of non-European ethnicity as Managing Director or CEO.
    • Gender splits varied significantly by discipline/department. Creative/design was the most male skewed 58% male/39%, HR/Admin was the most female skewed.
    • The advertising and communications agencies surveyed were significantly younger than the total working population as a whole; 61% were under 35 versus 27% in the total NZ working age population. Whereas 23% of the working age population is 50-64, only 6% of those sampled fell into this age group.
    • There are more of European ethnicity in the industry compared to the general working population (87% versus 73%). One in ten respondents were of Asian ethnicity (versus 13% of NZ working age population). Pasifika peoples accounted for 3% versus 6% of working age population, while Māori were the most under represented, accounting for 4% versus 13% in the working age population.
    • Proportions of LBGQT people within the industry mirrored those in the population as a whole, and similarly for different religious beliefs.
    • There appeared to be very low representation of people with disabilities or special needs with 1% of respondents having a disability or special need of some kind.

    The benefits of achieving greater diversity for our people, industry and clients are irrefutable. Greater diversity provides access to broader talent delivering creative advantage, greater innovation, improved decision-making and higher commercial returns.

    We know that we won’t transform our industry overnight, but are committed to doing what we can to help our members improve one step at a time in this important area.

    2018 Comms Council Industry Development & Event Calendar

    Posted 31 October 2017.

    The Comms Council is proud to offer a full range of courses, seminars and events for the coming year. Details can be viewed throughout this website or download the calendar here.

    2017 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ: GOLD papers

    Posted 30 October 2017.

    International Judge, Chris Baker explains below why these entries deserved to win gold. Download the papers below!

    ​Testicular Cancer New Zealand & FCB New Zealand - Go Balls Out

    VIEW PAPER

    Charity / Not for Profit

    Limited Budget: less than $100,000 - Sponsored by The Radio Bureau

    Most Effective Social Campaign

    Fire and Emergency New Zealand & FCB New Zealand - Escape My House

    VIEW PAPER

    Social Marketing / Public Service

    Most Effective Integrated Campaign - Sponsored by NZME

    Most Effective Use of Digital Technology - Sponsored by NZME

    Best Strategic Thinking - Sponsored by Nielsen

    Most Progressive Campaign

    Amplifon - Bay Audiology & Saatchi & Saatchi - The Emotional Hearing Test

    VIEW PAPER

    Consumer Durables

    Best Strategic Thinking - Sponsored by Nielsen

    Most Progressive Campaign - Sponsored by Adshel

    Mercury & FCB New Zealand - Energy Made Wonderful

    VIEW PAPER

    Consumer Services

    Most Effective Integrated Campaign - Sponsored by NZME

    Best Strategic Thinking - Sponsored by Nielsen

    Mars NZ & Colenso BBDO - Child Replacement Programme

    VIEW PAPER

    Most Effective Integrated Campaign - Sponsored by NZME

    DB Breweries & Colenso BBDO - Beer Bottle Sand

    VIEW PAPER

    Most Effective PR/Experiential Campaign

    Lion & DDB - The other side of Steinlager

    VIEW PAPER

    Best Strategic Thinking - Sponsored by Nielsen

    Maritime New Zealand & FCB New Zealand - Nudging Towards a New Normal

    VIEW PAPER

    Sustained Success - Sponsored by Bauer Media Group

    Lion & DDB - The other side of Steinlager

    Hardest Challenge

    Don’t be a Jekyll and Hyde brand

    Posted 26 October 2017.

    ​By Jacquie Bennett, Group Head of Strategy, Dentsu Aegis Network

    ​Imagine if one of your mates started behaving differently towards you, in different situations. At work, he avoids you. At the bar, he loves you. At home, he ignores you. At dinner, he only talks to your wife. At the gym, he wants to be your best mate. You would think that he had serious problems.

    Now, imagine that your friend is a brand and each of the situations above is a media channel. Work is LinkedIn, the bar is Snapchat, at home is television, at dinner is Facebook and the gym is Spotify. This brand has changed its personality, messaging, tone and behaviour to suit the media environment and suddenly you don’t know who he is or what he’s going to do next – and you sure as heck don’t trust him. Unfortunately, too many brands today end up acting like Jekyll and Hyde as they struggle with the demands of multiple channels.

    This wouldn’t have been an issue ten years ago, when the humble media plan consisted of only three channels. But these days, most media plans have up to ten channels and a third of them are social media. The way a brand communicates in social media is a totally different ball game because, unlike traditional media, it’s a two-way street where consumers can talk back and expect an “on-brand” response. Social media, therefore, requires a carefully crafted bespoke strategy and often this strategy stands alone, separate from other communication.

    This doesn’t sound so bad. But when you overlay the dynamics of a segmented marketing department, the numerous agencies that can be responsible for a brand, and the different performance metrics for each channel, it can present a real challenge. A challenge where multiple brand personalities start to arise, each with its own agenda.

    The goal for brands must be to stay consistent in this increasingly challenging environment. For a real-life example of a brand that does this well, look at Air New Zealand’s social pages, website, communication touchpoints and in-flight experience. In fact, they just won a Best Award for their excellence in brand effectiveness.

    Establishing clear brand guidelines is a crucial first step and should include a definition of what the brand stands for, its purpose, values, visual assets, brand personality and tone of voice. These guidelines shouldn’t sit in a bottom drawer, they should sit on everyone’s desk, from staff internally to partners externally.

    Writing a brand manifesto is an excellent way of articulating what a brand stands for, its tone, and how it behaves. The best manifestos have the power to rally an entire business, and are often consumer-facing; clearly defining to consumers what the brand stands for. Some of the best advertising campaigns are born from manifestos including the classic Apple ‘Crazy Ones’ campaign from 1984. (check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFEarBzelBs)

    Define the brand’s distinctive assets. According to Professor Byron Sharp, author of the now legendary marketing tome How Brands Grow, brands should seek to develop distinctiveness rather than differentiation. Being distinctive is about being easily identifiable, an important quality in today’s complex communication landscape. What qualities of the brand help consumers notice, recognise and recall it? Once these elements are identified, they can be built on and reinforced to make the brand more impactful to consumers, regardless of its environment.

    Develop a channel roadmap for the brand that includes all bought, owned and earned touchpoints. Articulate the role of each channel, how they work together, and how the channels are building the entire brand narrative.

    Responsibility for brand consistency should be assigned to an individual or team. It could be someone in the marketing department or someone from an agency. This individual or team becomes the guardian of the brand narrative, co-ordinating every channel to ensure they are working together and in isolation.

    These are the steps to curing brand schizophrenia. But the most crucial is to clearly define the core elements that make up your brand. If you’re not clear on this, how can the consumer be?

    Winners of the 2017 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ

    Posted 19 October 2017.

    ​Congratulations to all the finalists and winners!

    View the winners list here.

    ​SPECIAL AWARDS

    Hardest Challenge: Lion & DDB, The Other Side of Steinlager

    Marketer of the Year: Craig Baldie, Lion

    Most Effective Client of the Year: Fire and Emergency New Zealand

    Most Effective Agency of the Year: FCB New Zealand

    Grand Effie: Mercury & FCB New Zealand, Energy Made Wonderful

    Thank you to our sponsors: TVNZ, NZME, Nielsen, Adshel, The Radio Bureau, Bauer Media, Soar Print

    HARDEST CHALLENGE: Lion & DDB, The Other Side of Steinlager
    HARDEST CHALLENGE: Lion & DDB, The Other Side of Steinlager
    MARKETER OF THE YEAR: Craig Baldie, Lion
    MARKETER OF THE YEAR: Craig Baldie, Lion

    CLIENT OF THE YEAR: Fire and Emergency New Zealand
    CLIENT OF THE YEAR: Fire and Emergency New Zealand

    AGENCY OF THE YEAR: FCB
    AGENCY OF THE YEAR: FCB


    GRAND EFFIE: Mercury & FCB New Zealand, Energy Made Wonderful
    GRAND EFFIE: Mercury & FCB New Zealand, Energy Made Wonderful



    Ignore the rules at your own risk: Health & Safety Seminar

    Posted 19 October 2017.

    ​​Essential Health & Safety update for all event organisers.

    As the experiential channel continues to grow it has become increasingly important for brand events and activations to not only deliver compelling and effective experiences, but to do them safely and within health and safety requirements.

    Recent changes to NZ’s health and safety legislation have also put a focus on events and activations compliance of the new codes of conduct, with many operators unsure of the implications of these changes and how they affect the production of experiential activations and its relation to consumers and participants.

    In order to bridge the knowledge gap with the busy spring and summer activation period upon us, the Comms Council PR, Social and Experiential Committee will be running a free breakfast seminar focusing on the specific health and safety requirements of experiential activations.


    What will be covered?

    • Discussion on the changes to the legislation and how it relates to activations from a legal standpoint

    • Showcase best practice from an event or site owners perspective

    • Hear from the production industry on how they keep health and safety as a priority

    • How to manage events safely.


    Speakers include:

    • Sarah-Lee Stead - Senior Associate Kensington Swan, who will talk to the legal requirements of the new H&S legislation

    • Greg Skinner - Director at Rollercoaster and Event Safe

    • Ray Calcutt - Senior Health and Safety Advisor, Events at Regional Facilities Auckland who will be showcasing best practice from their perspective


    Who is it for?

    This update is for those that are responsible for the health and safety of people who work for you (including volunteers), your attendees (whether public, or invited guests) and contractors at your events.


    Details:

    Date: Thursday, 9 November 2017

    Time: 7.30am for a light breakfast (croissants, fruit, plus tea & coffee). 8am start and 9am conclusion

    Venue: Kensington Swan offices, 18 Viaduct Harbour Ave, Auckland, 1010

    Cost: Free to all Comms Council members or EMANZ members / $50 (plus GST) for other interested parties.

    Confirm your place by Tuesday, 2 November 2017.

    RSVP: by 2 November Please provide full name, position, and contact details of attendees - and advise any special dietary requirements to:

    Katie Ward, Comms Council Events Coordinator

    E: office@commscouncil.nz

    M: +64 22 176 2997

    P: +64 9 303 0435

    Agencies/clients will be invoiced by the Commercial Communications Council under normal terms of trade.

    See full T&Cs here.

    For more information please contact Marlen Smith, Comms Council Industry Development Manager

    P: 021 272 9998

    We gratefully acknowledge Health & Safety Partner Grant Nicholson and Kensington Swan for their support.

    Bridging marketing to the new age of advertising

    Posted 12 October 2017.

    ​By Ben Goodale, Managing Director, justONE

    It’s been a season of conferences, and one of the topics of rumination has been the role of agencies. I was fortunate enough to attend the Media and Marketing Summit in Melbourne recently, and of course Auckland saw the Direct Marketing Conference last month.

    Both included some quite strident opinion, which is always good to get the blood flowing. For example, in Melbourne we saw panels debate the evolution of agencies to meet the digital age, but also harking back to one of the fundamental offerings of agencies which, of course, is great creative work – and increasingly important in an age where there is so much fragmentation and where creative cut-through will elevate brands from the sea of sameness.

    This was a fascinating counterpoint to the DM Conference in Auckland where one speaker claimed (possibly to gasps of horror in the audience) that maybe agencies wouldn’t be needed soon, as they could do everything in-house themselves. Clearly, this speaker hadn’t got the memo about the value of creative excellence or was under the impression that the great creatives of the age want to work for them in-house.

    What was amusing was that this latter point was (to adopt an old Glasgow phrase) the “talk o’ the steamie” during the lunch break. Most opinion seemed to be that the speaker was hopelessly naïve, whilst doubtless some were eagerly rubbing their hands thinking how much they could save on agency fees in the future.

    But in Melbourne the conversation was very different. The really interesting (and interlinked) theme of the Summit was the changing face of the agency model, or more specifically, the now popular notion that ‘specialist agencies are back’. Whilst this concept isn’t new (as the best agencies are usually consultancies too), various CMOs and agency heads discussed how new ways of thinking are forcing the traditional agency to evolve, and how that’s a good and exciting thing.

    For example, nowadays, the role of a media agency is no longer just buying media; a creative agency can somehow easily morph into a media agency, and a media agency can become a digital shop. The list goes on (and on).

    So, is this the new agency model as we know it? Do communications and advertising businesses need to become more specialised in order to compete on an expertise level? Are we entering an age of consultancy ‘fiefdoms’? And, let’s face it, does this feel like groundhog day?

    We’re seeing some significant client shifts in the media, advertising, and marketing landscape here in New Zealand, but none showing a clear pattern. One minute a major financial services organisation opts for an agency specialist model, the next, a telco for a solo agency relationship.

    What isn’t happening is opting for no agency. Clearly, New Zealand’s leading marketers deeply value the expertise that the right agency (or agencies) can bring to their business.

    One area where agencies can help, other than creative, is with the complicated stuff. For instance, the growth in digital channels and big data (another big buzzword bandied around at the Summit), is starting to disrupt the way businesses deliver marketing messages, with technology allowing engagement at a much greater scale.

    That said, marketers’ excitement about this tends to massively overreach the capability for their systems and internal teams to deliver on it; it’s one area where agencies can be useful to plug those gaps and deliver ‘instant’ solutions while organisations build internal capability.

    With data analysis and insight being the next frontier for most businesses, agencies and organisations across all industries will no doubt be looking to beef up their data-driven strategic capabilities, investing in talent to better service this skillset. It reinforces the fact that as we push forward into the digital realm, specific expertise in technical and analytical knowledge will continue to alter the nature of marketing agencies for years to come.

    This is exciting because this new age of advertising allows us to fundamentally deliver CRM at scale – if not immediately for everyone, then certainly over the next wee while. We welcome the future and see the value of agencies having a significant lifespan – helping bridge New Zealand organisations to the new age.

    Mark Ritson Presentation - DOWNLOAD

    Posted 10 October 2017.

    Mark Ritson, Branding Professor and Marketing Consultant delivered a presentation on Tuesday 31st October

    DOWNLOAD THE PRESENTATION

    With his marketing expertise and his brutally honest style, this session with Mark Ritson is sure to leave you thinking differently. He’ll explain what has changed in the last decade and what you need to do about it now.

    WHAT’S COVERED

    In this applied and wide-ranging talk, Associate Professor Mark Ritson from Melbourne Business School, looked at the massive changes in marketing communications that have occurred in the past decade.

    Ritson was recently rated as “the World’s best marketing commentator” by Mumbrella for his recent columns on the state of marketing and branding, and in this session we found out why. He looked at the various fates of newspapers, TV, outdoor and digitial media and reviewed the current state of the market.

    He used this assessment to make some bold predictions for the coming decade in marketing communications.

    Inclusiveness & Diversity

    Posted 10 October 2017.

    2017 Finalists Announced for The Effie Awards in Association with TVNZ!

    Posted 29 September 2017.

    The biggest night on the New Zealand advertising industry calendar is fast approaching, with finalists in the 2017 NZ Effie Awards announced today.

    Organised by the Commercial Communications Council with key partner TVNZ, the 2017 NZ Effie Awards will be presented at a glittering ceremony at The Langham, Auckland on October 19th

    This year Effies is bringing attention to long term success; campaigns that have gone beyond short term returns and created genuine lasting change for an organisation. As part of this, the eligible entry dates for Effies has been extended backwards in order to create a more open window of eligibility for these long-term success stories. The intention of these new dates is to allow long term campaigns from the last 2 years an opportunity to demonstrate their success across a longer period of time than previously available.

    A panel of 150 expert industry judges in Auckland and Wellington assessed entries in two rounds to select just under 100 finalists across 17 categories. (See finalist list attached). Selections have also been made for the paper that deserves title of ‘The Hardest Challenge’ which will be announced on awards evening.

    All Gold Effie category winners will also be eligible for the Grand Effie®, which is awarded to the campaign that achieved the most extraordinary commercial result for its client. The winner will also receive $100,000 in TVNZ airtime, thanks to sponsor TVNZ*.

    This year’s executive judging panel includes internationally recognised strategic planner, Chris Baker, from the UK, founder of Bacon Strategy & Research Limited, a consultancy that brings fresh thinking, solutions and ways of working to brands, businesses and marketing communications. He has over 40 year’s experience working with brands and communications, with particular expertise in the area of communications effectiveness evaluation. While in New Zealand, he will be running a half day Planning for Effectiveness workshop on the morning of 12th October. He will also be delivering a keynote address at the Annual Effectiveness Function the same evening.

    Tickets for the 2017 NZ Effie Awards, in association with TVNZ, can be booked through Eventfinda here.

    Comms Council also thank commercial partner NZME, and sponsors Nielsen, Bauer, The Radio Bureau, Adshel and SOAR Print for making the 2017 Effie Awards possible.


    For more information, please contact:

    Natasha Galloway, Sponsorship and Events Director

    P: 09 303 0435

    E: natasha@commscouncil.nz

    * Terms and conditions apply

    Ticket sales for the 2017 NZ Effie Awards Gala Dinner now open

    Navigating the Agency Selection Process

    Posted 25 September 2017.

    ​The Association of New Zealand Advertisers (ANZA) and the Commercial Communications Council saw a clear need to help shape the thinking and approach to the agency selection process. The way things have been traditionally done means that the selection processes are inefficient, even poorly managed. This has huge risks of poor outcomes and simply adds cost to agencies and to the clients of those agencies.

    With this in mind ANZA and the Comms Council came together to work collaboratively, along with input from clients and agencies, to create a best practice guide to help ease the process, tailored to the New Zealand market.

    There have been risks and challenges on both sides with advertisers appointing a new agency, whether the process involved going to a full pitch or one of the many alternatives. Agencies have found themselves in a costly business where resources are swallowed up with no guaranteed outcomes. While clients can be left with work not meeting expectations, difficulty managing multiple agency relationships and potentially the need to go through the whole process again in short order if they get it wrong. This is not only disruptive to both sides, but is slows down marketing momentum.

    “The risks of choosing the wrong service model or not securing the right partner can be very costly. ANZA encourages advertisers to use this guide whenever they are reviewing agency partners or considering a selection process.” Lindsay Mouat, CEO ANZA

    This Code of Best Practice is designed to help companies select the right partner for their organisation. The document is a cooperative effort to help clients navigate the complexities inherent in appointing agency partners and to improve the outcomes of the new business process for both clients and agencies.

    “We believe that a positive selection process should be the foundation for a strong and mutually rewarding long term relationship but there is a need and an opportunity for new thinking to make the process more effective and efficient for all involved.” Paul Head, CEO Comms Council

    The guide provides a set of operating principles for managing a business review along with useful information on what’s happening in the market, the various partnership models available and some tips on agency remuneration. It’s designed to cover all types of agencies from creative and media to experiential, digital, PR and other. The joint hope is that the members of ANZA and the Commercial Communications Council will accept this as not just a guide to best practice, but use it as a starting point for all new business discussions.

    Download the code of best practice here

    Effectiveness Workshop 2017 with Chris Baker Effies International Judge

    Posted 20 September 2017.

    It’s time to burst the bubbles.


    REGISTER NOW - email kate@commscouncil.nz

    This year’s international Effie Awards Judge, Chris Baker, will be in Auckland for the first time prior to the big night and is running a half day effectiveness workshop.

    Chris has been in the industry for over 35 years. Along the way he’s honed his planning effectiveness skills and is exceptional at his craft. In this interactive workshop he will share some of the lessons, techniques and tools learned. You will definitely leave with new knowledge to support you in your role.


    Who should attend?

    The workshop is designed for people that want to understand how they can add value to their client relationships and want to deliver strategic direction and business value. You will learn how to engage with a client’s broader commercial and brand agenda, to understand and help shape ‘the brief behind the brief’.

    You’ll typically know the importance of a great strategy, thinking and the development of great work. However, this is all academic if you don’t win the pitch, get the client to share ownership of the strategy and the solution, engage the business beyond the person who briefed you, and then learn from the outcomes.


    What’s covered?

    • ‘Winning Friends and influencing People’ – engagement principles to grow broader strategic understanding and influence, and democratize strategy development.

    • Objective-setting and the foundations of effectiveness measurement – ensure Communications objectives sit clearly in the context of Business (commercial) and Marketing (behavioral) objectives.

    • The Brand as the overall organizing principle – put ideas and short-term activations in their place, avoid the danger of brand fragmentation; create the conditions for sustainable growth.

    • Brand Archetypes and how to use them – a top tool for Planners and client engagement.

    • Behavior Change Models – practical tools to broaden the agency role and value.

    • Psychology Maps (Category and Consumer Segment) – quick ways of creating strategic understanding and alignment.

    Book now as spaces are limited.

    Details:

    Date: Thursday, 12 October 2017

    Time: 8.30am registration. Refreshments available upon arrival with a morning tea break.

    8.45am -1pm workshop.

    Venue: NZME. 2 Graham Street, Auckland 1010, Auckland

    Paid Parking in the vicinity but we strongly recommend using taxi services

    Cost: $395 +GST p/p for Comms Council Members & ANZA Members

    Non – members $895.00 + GST

    Register by Wednesday, 4 October 2017 – via email kate@commscouncil.nz

    Please provide full name, position, and contact details of attendees - and advise any special dietary requirements to:

    Kate Cronin-Smith, Comms Council Events Coordinator

    E: kate@commscouncil.nz

    M: +64 22 176 2997

    P: +64 9 303 0435

    Agencies/clients will be invoiced by the Commercial Communications Council under normal terms of trade.

    See full T&Cs here

    For more information please contact Marlen Smith, Comms Council Industry Development Manager

    P: 021 272 9998

    Navigating the Agency Selection Process

    Posted 20 September 2017.

    ​The Association of New Zealand Advertisers (ANZA) and the Commercial Communications Council saw a clear need to help shape the thinking and approach to the agency selection process. The way things have been traditionally done means that the selection processes are inefficient, even poorly managed. This has huge risks of poor outcomes and simply adds cost to agencies and to the clients of those agencies.

    With this in mind ANZA and the Comms Council came together to work collaboratively, along with input from clients and agencies, to create a best practice guide to help ease the process, tailored to the New Zealand market.

    There have been risks and challenges on both sides with advertisers appointing a new agency, whether the process involved going to a full pitch or one of the many alternatives. Agencies have found themselves in a costly business where resources are swallowed up with no guaranteed outcomes. While clients can be left with work not meeting expectations, difficulty managing multiple agency relationships and potentially the need to go through the whole process again in short order if they get it wrong. This is not only disruptive to both sides, but is slows down marketing momentum.

    “The risks of choosing the wrong service model or not securing the right partner can be very costly. ANZA encourages advertisers to use this guide whenever they are reviewing agency partners or considering a selection process.” Lindsay Mouat, CEO ANZA

    This Code of Best Practice is designed to help companies select the right partner for their organisation. The document is a cooperative effort to help clients navigate the complexities inherent in appointing agency partners and to improve the outcomes of the new business process for both clients and agencies.

    “We believe that a positive selection process should be the foundation for a strong and mutually rewarding long term relationship but there is a need and an opportunity for new thinking to make the process more effective and efficient for all involved.” Paul Head, CEO Comms Council

    The guide provides a set of operating principles for managing a business review along with useful information on what’s happening in the market, the various partnership models available and some tips on agency remuneration. It’s designed to cover all types of agencies from creative and media to experiential, digital, PR and other. The joint hope is that the members of ANZA and the Commercial Communications Council will accept this as not just a guide to best practice, but use it as a starting point for all new business discussions.

    Download the code of best practice here

    Time to get out of the weeds

    Posted 19 September 2017.

    By Paul Head, CEO Commercial Communications Council

    ​In an interview published in Marketing Week very recently, internationally renowned marketing professor Mark Ritson was asked what he believes are the biggest challenges facing marketers.

    His response: ‘tactification’. “We are obsessed with execution and specifically communication,” said Ritson. “Too many marketers are not just strategically negligent, they don’t know the difference between tactical execution and strategic planning.”

    I think he’s right. We’ve got lost in the weeds; too many of us are focused on short-termism, campaign optimisation and ROI. And while this all matters (probably) and makes for an easier conversation with the CFO when it comes to reporting time, it’s not particularly strategic. This is true whether you sit in a marketing department, an agency or somewhere else in the marketing value chain.

    And it results from constant pressure on marketing departments and agencies alike to be “more efficient” rather than more effective. This creates a situation where marketers are focused on the too-near term in their businesses, instead of building powerful brands that can command a premium, maintain loyal customers, attract new ones and grow the business bottom-line in the long term.

    For many businesses, brand is the most valuable asset they have, whether it’s on the balance sheet or not. Yet it is very often managed and invested in on a short-term time horizon. This is counter-intuitive and in direct contrast to how businesses plan investment and capital expenditure when it comes to their other assets. Building a new distribution centre is something that is planned carefully, funds are set aside, protected and the asset is invested in on an ongoing basis. Whilst this may seem like a simplistic analysis, I believe the principle is valid. All too often we fail to treat brand the way we do other significant assets in our businesses.

    As marketers, we need to challenge this paradigm, but in a data-driven and rational marketing world it takes bravery to do so.

    The good news is that there is a rapidly growing body of evidence from leading marketing experts such as Peter Field, Les Binet and others that a focus on short-term tactical is not only short-sighted, it’s also doing harm to brands and business profitability. Peter Field’s work clearly demonstrates that the focus on short-term tactical campaigns, driven by digital over the past decade, has actually had the effect of making campaigns less effective and eroded profitability for businesses. By contrast, businesses that invest in long-term brand building are significantly more likely to grow overall profitability (as opposed to campaign ROI) than those that don’t.

    Based on thousands of international marketing case studies, Field’s latest work suggests that an ideal mix might be to spend 60% of budget on long-term brand building and 40% on tactics and activation. Whether the ratio is exactly right for every business is questionable, but the evidence for a much stronger focus on brand building is becoming compelling.

    Our challenge as marketers is to get out of the weeds and start to think strategically again. These could well be challenging and uncomfortable conversations to have with your CEO or CFO but we’re seeing evidence of this globally, with multi-nationals like P&G stating publicly that they over-targeted and plan to invest more in brand building. When the world’s leading marketing organisation admits that it got it wrong, it’s time for us all to sit up and take notice. Local marketers who lead the charge in this will reap the benefits of first mover advantage.

    The Effectiveness Function 2017 in association with TVNZ

    Posted 12 September 2017.

    The Comms Council in association with TVNZ, is delighted to present this year’s International Effie’s Judge, Chris Baker at the Effectiveness Function on Thursday 12th October, at TVNZ.

    BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL: email office@commscouncil.nz

    Chris Baker is the founder of Bacon Strategy & Research Limited UK, a consultancy that brings fresh thinking, solutions and ways of working to brands, businesses and marketing communications. He helped pioneer thinking on the ‘longer and broader’ effects of advertising, and has written, judged and mentored on hundreds of effectiveness awards papers. Chris currently consults regularly for clients on effectiveness evaluation, both directly and working with The Effectiveness Partnership, UK.

    At the Effectiveness Function, Chris will cover overcoming short-termism, expanding on the theme that short-termism kills effectiveness. He will share what he believes is the antidote; the development of a strong marketing effectiveness culture focused on long-term growth. He will draw heavily on the latest research by Binet and Field on marketing effectiveness in a digital era as well as broader learnings from the UK IPA EffWorks initiative and recent effectiveness awards.

    This includes the need for both agencies and marketing clients to think outside the marketing communications bubble, and ask, “Are we building businesses or just running activations and campaigns?”

    We look forward to hearing Chris Baker share the effects of these ideas as exciting opportunities for businesses and marketers. There will be chance for Q&A.

    Date: Thursday 12th October

    Time: 5:30pm to 7:30pm - Drinks and canapés on arrival, Presentations begin at 6.00pm

    Venue: TVNZ, Main reception, Hobson Street, Auckland

    Cost: None

    To register for this free event, email office@commscouncil.nz today - spaces are limited and tickets for entry will be allocated.

    The Comms Council acknowledges TVNZ for their support of this event.

    BOTAB 2017 Winners - Fish TACO

    Posted 1 September 2017.

    ​​For the first time in BOTAB’s 10-year history, Flying Fish have taken out the championship title with their band, Fish TACO.

    See the photos

    Although the judging panel, Matt Heath, Jeremy Wells (Radio Hauraki) and Matt Headland (NZME), were impressed by all of the performances, there could only be one winner. Fish TACO’s set was tight and their vocals ambitious. They nailed the whole thing and the crowd wanted seconds - their encore performance only confirming their trophy-winning spot.

    Once again, Saatchi & Saatchi delivered the Best Performer of the night, frontwoman Kristine Green. Her vocals and stage presence were unparalleled, winning her a travel voucher to the value of $1000 thanks to Fortis Travel.

    Thanks to all the bands that competed:

    • Fish TACO from Flying Fish

    • Still Serenading Shirley from FCB

    • Kurt Cocaine & the 27 Club from DDB

    • Friends Electric from Barnes, Catmur and Friends Dentsu

    • The Strands from Saatchi & Saatchi

    • Pegasus and The Job Numbers from ColensoBBDO

    BOTAB 2017 was proudly brought to you by: Flying Fish & the Commercial Communications Council

    And of course BOTAB wouldn’t be possible without the love and support of our sponsors Apex Insurance, Franklin Rd, Fortis Travel, Blunt Umbrellas, Event Cinemas, NW Group, Whittakers, Vodafone, Radio Hauraki, Mandy VFX, SOAR Printing, Monteiths, Fruit Guys, My Food Bag, Prego & Much Moore Ice Cream.

    Kristine Green - Best Performer

    Kristine Green - Best Performer
    Fish TACO - Winning Band
    Fish TACO - Winning Band

    Judges Jeremy Wells, Matt Heath, and Matt Headland
    Judges Jeremy Wells, Matt Heath, and Matt Headland

    A Question of Trust

    Posted 28 August 2017.

    ​By Claudia Macdonald, Founder and MD, Mango Communications.

    ​I’ve been thinking a lot about trust. Having flown recently, it strikes me that trust is largely what gets us in that plane and hurtling across the skies. I don’t know how to fly a plane, I just trust that the person up front does; and that trust of the airline and its pilots is what keeps me flying.

    Trust is big in business too. But less and less so. Today, accepting a person’s handshake as their word seems ridiculously naïve. Contracts are essential and in our industry we need to know a company is credit-worthy before we can even accept their business. As companies become more global, with the ‘return of value to the shareholder’ the glue that binds our every deed, we no longer trust people — we trust their balance sheet. I realise there are crooks and white collar criminals out there, it’s just we’ve become so distrustful now that it colours who we believe and how we act.

    As our general election approaches, the issue of trust will be questioned and, possibly, found lacking. The primary role of politicians prior to elections appears to be convincing voters to trust them to perform, keep their word, deliver on their mandate; while the opposition tries to demonstrate all the ways in which their counterpart cannot be trusted.

    It is often through the information shared by third party channels that we build trust. When I first went into journalism I had been taught to believe the news media was an objective, independent source of unbiased information: something you could trust to tell you the truth – or at least to lay the facts before you to assess. Learning that my editor was a paid-up member of the National Party rather dented my trust in the unbiased nature of the paper at the time, but it was restored in witnessing the combined efforts of journalists and subeditors from across the political spectrum to ensure it presented a neutral view.

    Working in the UK woke me up to the concept of politically-aligned media. And while a little strange initially, at least I knew I was getting conservative-biased views when I read The Telegraph and socialist spin from The Daily Mirror. This division still exists and is more prevalent than ever. But we all know it, so we adjust our filter and reasoning powers in response.

    Fast forward to 2016 and the introduction of the term ‘fake news’ (Thank you, Donald Trump). Although, rather than lies, the term is generally used to describe facts and figures you don’t agree with. Unfortunately, it also feeds the sense that once trusted (albeit biased) media can no longer be relied upon to tell the truth about anything – certainly not important social and political issues, let alone ‘man bites dog’ stories.

    If you feel you can’t trust the news (and I’m not saying that you can’t in New Zealand) then here’s hoping that you can trust the people, the brands and the organisations you interact with.

    The last five years has seen the rapid growth of another source of information – thanks to the internet and its various platforms and the growing distrust of the established channels – namely the rise of influencers (bloggers, celebrities, Instagrammers), which has been both exciting and challenging. As an industry we’re still working out which ones are actually influential, while consumers are busy sorting those who are trustworthy and authentic from the ‘friend-buyers’ and fakes.

    Today, trusted brands, trusted advisors and trusted sources are more important than ever. The catch is that to become a trusted brand, you must first earn that trust and this can only be done through consistency: by demonstrating trustworthy behaviour time and again.

    Consistency should be paramount for brands – but this doesn’t mean never changing, or being inflexible. It means delivering as your customers expect you to. If there are changes afoot, then communicate those clearly, transparently, honestly.

    As the mistrust of traditional channels of communication builds, our role as communicators must be to ensure the brands, people and organisations we represent are seen to deliver on their promises. Our job is to keep their communications honest. Given that PR people have so often been labelled ‘paid liars’ we owe it to ourselves to guide our clients to prove the opposite.

    Google

    Posted 28 August 2017.

    BOTAB 2017: Battle of the Decades - Tickets On Sale

    Posted 15 August 2017.

    ​The BOTAB 2017 ticket link is live! Don’t miss out on the one event that draws the whole industry together - this August 31st at the Kings Arms.

    The prizes are great, the venue is legendary, and the competition is fierce.

    It’s our last year at the beloved Kings Arms, so you’ll want to get your ticket pretty quick-smart.

    This year we have 6 of the best agency bands going head-to-head to claim victory in the Battle of the Decades:

    • Last year’s winners, Friends Electric - Barnes, Catmur & Friends Dentsu
    • Pegasus and the Job Numbers - Colenso BBDO
    • Still Serenading Shirley - FCB
    • Kurt Cocaine and the 27 Club - DDB
    • The Strands - Saatchi & Saatchi
    • And of course, Flying Fish

    The event is strictly R18. One free drink with every ticket.

    Bring your gold coins for the sausage sizzle.All proceeds will go to the New Zealand Music Foundation to help with their goal of changing lives through music.

    Much Moore Ice-cream will be giving away free cones on the night along with loads of great prizes including bar tabs thanks to Apex Insurance and Franklin Rd, Event Cinema tickets, Gourmet My Food Bags, Monteiths beer, Fruit Guys fruit boxes, chocolate from Whittakers, phone cards from Vodafone, Blunt Umbrellas and more. Bring your business cards to enter the draws.

    Don’t forget your ID. There will be no door sales, tickets must be pre-purchased. This year we are strictly doing e-tickets only as they will be scanned at the door on arrival. You must print out your ticket. No ticket, no entry.

    GET YOUR TICKET HERE

    Adshel

    Posted 11 August 2017.

    Dawn of the Data

    Posted 2 August 2017.

    ​By Stevie Weber, Head of Strategy at Zenith.

    ​There’s no denying data is having a moment. Perhaps more than that, given it’s next to impossible to read any industry article or award-entry, or to sit through a meeting devoid of a data mention. It’s little wonder some, namely creatives, are starting to feel displaced and that this whole “data thing” is some extravagant wizardry. Yet it’s hard to argue when agency titles like “Data Scientist”, “Data Forensic Specialist”, and “Galactic Viceroy of Research Excellence” are becoming the norm. Whilst intriguing to some (and debatable to others), the real problem is that these titles reinforce the notion that data is used predominantly in hindsight – just as scientists and forensic specialists are typically brought in after an incident to establish what happened. Similarly, we tend to look back on campaigns to determine where they’ve been effective or ineffective. The problem with this is that the damage has been done. Equally, our efforts to temporarily boost success regularly sees focus shift to mid-campaign, when we’re tasked with exploring how best to optimize creative performance. Again, most of the damage has been done because if a campaign is mediocre to begin with, optimization is probably limited. Instead, we need our data to help predict and inform what can go right from the beginning. Data has the capacity to influence and recalibrate creativity, versus allowing us to purely monitor it. Data has the proficiency to constantly collect information to benefit the ‘always-on’ mentality versus sporadic tactical campaigns that lose sight of building brand meaning and true purpose.

    However, it doesn’t take a “data scientist” to figure out that the general sentiment is that data stifles creativity. It’s a perceived roadblock to bold, imaginative, instinctual ideas and has the tendency to repel creatives. Data looks pretty sterile and mundane at first glance – the polar opposite of creatives’ very existence. Scanning statistics and data bits squeezed into dozens of Excel sheets and then engineering a system to interpret it does not excite many. Although visualization software is helpful, there’s only so much an infographic can tell us – and it’s unlikely to be a deep, mind-altering human insight. It is here that this alleged disconnect between science and creativity occurs: that data cannot produce an emotional connection with the consumer. We want to develop work and messages that are ingrained in the social fabric of our consumers; that penetrate public consciousness and that infiltrate or create cultural phenomenon. I would like to add my voice to the increasing view that this is our “Mecca” and reaching it requires data from the get-go. So no, data is not stifling creativity – it has the power to make it better. Putting the most obvious benefits aside (smarter targeting, stronger resonating messages, product innovation, media mix modelling, and the uncovering of profound consumer insights), data puts us in the driver’s seat. It allows us to guide consumers through trends that WE are forecasting or anticipating, ones that our consumers have not yet consciously identified.

    Data is a supreme being, trapped in a stale looking body. To use it effectively there is a need to “creatify” it, to dramatise it, to breathe life into it. We need to know what to measure or observe, how to extract insights and humanise it and finally, how to unearth the most motivating, captivating storyline within that information.

    As the gap between creative approach and actual campaign objectives becomes more evident, data’s role must be reconsidered. It needs to inform creativity, not just help creativity perform. As data remains centre stage it should foster a greater collaboration between media and creative agencies. Ideally, it should push past collaboration to partnership. For too long now media agencies are brought in at the back end of the creative process as executors or implementers. This is a missed opportunity, when it is often the media and digital teams rich with data who can add value much earlier in the process. But they need to get better at showcasing their value and engaging creative agencies. To ensure this works well, we need people in place who know how to identify and tell a damn good story from the data. So, instead of eradicating the ridiculous “data” related titles, I propose we continue to recruit, because what we really need next in this industry are “data journalists”, “data artists”, “data dramatists” or “data provocateurs” …take your pick!

    International Judge announced - 2017 Effie Awards in association with TVNZ

    Posted 1 August 2017.

    ​The Comms Council is pleased to announce the appointment of Chris Baker, Founder at Bacon Strategy & Research London as this year’s International Judge for the Effie Awards in association with TVNZ.

    CHRIS BAKER – BACON STRATEGY & RESEARCH

    Chris Baker is the founder of Bacon Strategy & Research Limited, a consultancy that brings fresh thinking, solutions and ways of working to brands, businesses and marketing communications. He has over 40 year’s experience working with brands and communications, with particular expertise in the area of communications effectiveness evaluation.

    With degrees in Physics and Economics from the University of Sussex, he started his career in market research at BMRB in 1973, before moving to Saatchi & Saatchi in 1981, becoming Deputy Head of Planning in 1988. He was a founder member of Bainsfair Sharkey Trott (BST.BDDP) in 1990, where he was Planning Director. Subsequent mergers in 1997 and 1998 took him to senior planning roles at GGT.BDDP, then TBWA as Director of Strategic Consultancy. He set up Bacon Strategy & Research in 2008.

    His experience is broad, covering hundreds of brands across most sectors, consumer packaged goods, automotive, public sector, charities, and beyond. In recent years much of his work has involved the translation of traditional planning disciplines to brands in the digital world.

    Effectiveness Credentials

    Chris has been involved with the IPA Effectiveness Awards since their early days – his first IPA entry, for Farmer’s Table Chicken in 1982, is perhaps best forgotten but is regrettably still available online via WARC/ IPA database. He helped pioneer thinking on the ‘longer and broader’ effects of advertising, and has written, judged and mentored on hundreds of effectiveness awards papers.

    He judged the IPA Effectiveness Awards in 1990, 1992 and 1994 and, as Convenor of Judges, was editor of ‘Advertising Works’, volumes 7 & 8. He has won several IPA Effectiveness Awards over the years, including Silver for Castlemaine XXXX in 1986, Gold and Special Prize for Integration for the launch of the Central London Congestion Charge in 2004, plus Gold and Special Prize for Channel Planning for Digital Switchover in 2012. He maintains an ongoing involvement with the IPA Effectiveness Awards as a mentor for entrants.

    He currently consults regularly for clients on effectiveness evaluation, both directly and working with The Effectiveness Partnership.

    Chris is a Fellow of the IPA, was a Full Member of the Market Research Society, and was recently one of the first inductees to the IPA Effectiveness Hall of Fame. He also consults for The Advertising Association on subjects such as the impact of alcohol advertising on young people and the commercialisation of childhood.

    First Five Rungs Speaker Series 2017

    Posted 31 July 2017.

    Purchase tickets

    You see them, hear them and read about them. How about talking to them?

    Secure your tickets to the First Five Rungs Speaker Series: Media Movers.

    Featuring:

    Amber Peebles, TV Presenter, Radio Host, Fashion Editor, Stylist, Blogger & MC

    Steven Fernandez, Editor of REMIX MAGAZINE

    Nickson Clark, Mai Morning Crew

    An additional speaker to be announced

    Spend the evening with these homegrown media personalities and learn about their rise to the top, as they detail their journey from grad to great in the media landscape.

    If you’re in your first five years of the advertising/comms world – grab a ticket for this First Five Rungs speaker event – take time out to network, indulge in some hospitality and hear from our great speaker line-up.

    The panel of speakers will talk about how they got their break and share insight into their working days, plus there will be an open Q&A, offering a unique opportunity for attendees to ask the panel their career questions.

    Date: Wednesday 23rd August

    Time: 6 - 9pm

    Venue: The Generator, 28 Customs Street East, Auckland (in The Lounge room, upstairs)

    Cost: $20 + GST and credit fee

    Ticket numbers are limited, so we suggest you get in quick. Purchase here.

    With thanks to our generous partners, the Commercial Communications Council and 3rdeye Recruitment

    Keep in touch with the First Five Rungs on Facebook

    Reputation Security in the Age of Cyber Risk

    Posted 18 July 2017.

    ​By Rewa Willis, Director, Sherson Willis and Comms Council PREScom Committee member.

    ​In February this year, the 20th annual PWC CEO Survey revealed that 91% of New Zealand’s CEOs are concerned about cyber-attacks, compared with only 61% globally. The C-suite’s growing concern over digital security reflects the views of cyber security experts, with New Zealand businesses among the world’s highest outsourcers of their IT network management and data storage.

    The Directors’ Risk Survey conducted by Marsh showed New Zealand directors think cyber-attacks will be the biggest threat locally this year. These fears were confirmed with the unprecedented global reach of the Petya and WannaCry attacks. The high-profile ransomware attacks hit companies of all sizes in both the public and private sectors, sparking panic worldwide.

    The financial impact of cyber security breaches tends to focus on the immediate cost of the attack: data has been compromised. Recent insights from Juniper predict that criminal data breaches will cost businesses US$8 trillion over the next five years. However, the real cost of a cyber-attack hits at the heart of an organisation – at something much more difficult to recover than data: your reputation. With the rise of the so-called ‘reputation economy’ reputation is now a capital asset.

    As The Economist recently reported, it’s not a matter of if, but when. Ransomware made headlines last month, but it could be anything from data breaches to phishing scandals next. Cyber-attacks are constantly evolving, hard to explain and even harder to trace. The lack of an obvious culprit often means blame falls on the organisation victimised in the attack, for a perceived lack of security. Australia has introduced mandatory reporting of data breaches, leading to a rise in companies reviewing their cyber security practices.

    The most crucial step in securing your reputation against the damaging effects of a cyber-attack is planning, but the recent New Zealand Institute of Directors’ survey found that 32% of respondents had no framework to manage cyber-attacks.

    Your first step is to get match fit. A team can’t run onto the pitch and win the game if they’ve never played before.

    Start with your staff. No organisation is immune to cyber-attacks. It is impossible to completely guarantee the safety of your data against an endlessly shape-shifting threat. Instead, the focus should be on identifying and managing risk. New cyber tools and technology are being deployed to mitigate ‘human risk,’ because cyber security isn’t just a tech issue, it’s a people issue. Making ‘cyber hygiene’ part of your organisational culture is now a priority for every Kiwi business.

    Start communicating with your staff about their role as the first line of defence against cyber security issues. It ranks up there with Health and Safety, and staff should understand how to keep themselves and your organisation safe. Attacks will target ‘human end points’ – figures within the operation who have gaps in their awareness around cyber security and risk. The more aware your people are, the safer your business is. Teach staff to be your ‘human firewall’ – make communication about a security-conscious culture a priority and give everyone the right skills at the right levels to spot potential threats.

    Having mission critical IT infrastructure management and data storage outsourced to third party providers can create additional complexity and add time to your crisis response if you’re hacked or your network is compromised. Choose a team of internal and external advisors before a crisis hits, so you can plan and practise with them. Make sure you have communications and cyber security experts who know and trust each other, so they’re speaking the same language when a breach occurs.

    When an issue occurs, ‘gamify’ what’s happened and what could happen because of it – play out every scenario that could occur. This will enable you to give your board, management team, staff and customers the right information they need to help protect themselves and the organisation.

    Transparency is key. Customers need to have confidence that you’ll tell them first if something’s gone wrong and give them the information they need to protect themselves, or mitigate the damage if data is taken. If your customer’s data has been compromised they need to know what’s been taken and what steps they can take to protect themselves. Reputation is all about trust.

    The Silicon Valley morality escape clause

    Posted 5 July 2017.

    ​By Simon Lendrum - Managing Director, J. Walter Thompson

    ​Endless commentary tells us that today, brands should stand for something good – it helps them stand out, millennials gravitate towards good corporations, and it’s the right thing to do post-GFC when everyone lost their moral compass.

    By that reasoning, Uber should be up for sale on Trade Me with a dollar reserve. Here is a company where casual sexism has long been an issue; where data privacy has been an oxymoron; and where drivers are abused by the company, both by punitive practices and literally by the (now former) CEO himself. But Uber’s garage sale is far from a reality. Instead, valuations of the company are still in the US$50-$70bn range based on 2016 net revenue of US$6.5bn and continued growth in bookings – meaning a whole lot of people are prepared to ignore foibles such as sexual harassment if they get cheap cabs.

    Why? Why does Uber get a free pass when the likes of United get swift punishment for poor behaviour?

    There’s an argument that suggests Uber’s degenerate side has been protected through private ownership – had it been publicly listed we’d probably have seen more volatility in stock price as a consequence of each PR debacle. But I think there’s a Silicon Valley effect in play here too. It seems to me we have two sets of moral standards: one to which we expect ‘traditional’ businesses to adhere, and one that provides multiple escape clauses for tech companies. This double standard needs explanation.

    Technology companies deliver products and services that garner excitement and attention. The 19th century thinker, James Allen, asserted that “there can be no progress nor achievement without sacrifice”. Silicon Valley seems to have embraced this with gusto. If the product or service is great enough, don’t worry about the side effects. The gig economy that Uber represents has run roughshod over concerns around employee rights and fair pay, with a Trump-esque approach to narrative.

    Like-minded companies have even joined forces to ensure a consistent message supports their pursuits – The On-Demand Economy is a formal group established to ‘provide an unbiased platform to meet influential industry participants…discover, celebrate, and learn from this innovative new industry that is redefining commerce by making lives around the world easier and more convenient’. There’s a word missing there. In reality, it’s about making ‘some’ lives easier, whatever the consequences. Consumer demand for convenience is enormous and seems to override concerns about good corporate behaviour.

    A similar defence appears at other Silicon Valley behemoths. Recent concerns around inappropriate content on social platforms, and placement of major brands alongside such content, is explained away as the cost of progress. We’re in a different time, the argument goes, and the vast content we all enjoy could not be possible if monitoring were universal. In short, if you’re expecting Google and Facebook to protect us from inappropriate usage, you’re a Luddite. This is simply the sacrifice we must make in exchange for the progress the tech giants deliver. The reality is that the vast majority embrace the good, and tacitly ignore the not-so-good, because we attribute a different set of rules to endeavours we see as transformative. But this should be no excuse for moral bankruptcy.

    It’s nothing new, either. The British East India Company dominated trade in centuries past, providing rich resources to consumers and arguably re-shaping the world around it. Conversely, it also became synonymous with oppression, exploitation, and tyranny. Undoubtedly, those who benefited deemed such sacrifices worthwhile, but the cost to humanity was dear.

    As the board of Uber implements changes recommended by a recent report into company practice, they would be well served to learn from the past. To ensure the business endures it must deliver value not only to its consumers, but also to employees, and the communities and economies within which it operates.

    Establishing a brand purpose that goes beyond product description is critical. Doing so would provide a filter for behaviour, process and action that is sympathetic both to the profit motive and the desire for good corporate citizenry that would enable Uber to rise above the Silicon Valley bubble and be judged alongside other long-standing corporations in accountability and contribution to society.

    Inclusiveness & Diversity Group

    Posted 26 June 2017.

    ​The Comms Council Inclusiveness & Diversity Group was established in 2016 to enhance the relevance and competitiveness of the NZ industry by:

    • championing the benefits of diversity on creative thinking and commercial outcomes

    • helping member agencies develop greater diversity at all levels

    Group Members:

    Megan Clark - Managing Director, Copper Brand Experiences (Chair)

    Megan is the Managing Director of specialist brand experience agency, Copper. She has been invited to judge at many local awards shows in 2014 was the New Zealand juror on both the 2014 Cannes Lions Promo & Activation jury and the 2014 Spikes Asia Promo, Activation & Direct juries. In 2015 Megan was invited on to the Cannes International Steering Committee to for the development of the Cannes Lions Promo & Activation category awards process. She is the former Chair of the Comms Council’s PR, Experiential and Social Media Committee and a former Comms Council Executive Board member. Megan’s passion for a better world of communications led her to Chair the newly formed Diversity & Inclusiveness Council and she looks forward to helping make a difference.

    Bonnie Shum - Senior Account Manager, Special Group

    Bonnie is a Senior Account Manager at the Special Group NZ. She has been a key client contact and project manager for a number of iconic organisations in New Zealand ranging from Air New Zealand, Mitre 10, to the University of Auckland. Kicking off her career with a Comms Council Internship in 2013, Bonnie has since remained heavily involved in the Council’s initiatives. She is the deputy chair of the Comms Council Young Leadership Group who are behind the First Five Rungs initiative which is dedicated to leading, inspiring and empowering the young talent in the industry as well as being an advocate for the inclusiveness and diversity movement in her own agency.

    Karen Sew Hoy - HR Director, DDB

    Karen is the HR Director for DDB New Zealand, one of Auckland’s most successful agencies. Having worked in HR for many years, in both public and private sectors, Karen has a vast amount of experience when it comes to what drives, motivates and engages people to perform at their best. An accredited Myers Briggs practitioner and an ICC accredited coach, Karen has a great appreciation on how diversity and differences can positively impact a workplace.

    Cassidy Meredith - Group Account Director, Spark PR & Activate

    Cassidy is a Group Account Director at Spark PR & Activate across New Zealand and Australia. During his time in the communications industry, he has worked across both public relations and advertising on a number of high profile accounts. They have included not-for-profit organisation The Quit Group, technology giant Sony, global sports brand adidas and FMCG conglomerates Unilever and DB Breweries. It didn’t take long for Cass to get involved with the Diversity & Inclusiveness Council as he’s a firm believer that greater diversity in the workplace delivers greater amazing work and better work environment.

    Elza Bashota - HR Coordinator, Dentsu Aegis Network

    Elza is the HR Coordinator at Dentsu Aegis Network (DAN) New Zealand. She joined as an HR Intern in August 2016 during her final semester of a Bachelor of Business degree. She has a genuine passion for creating a diverse, inclusive, and inspiring work environment. During her time at DAN, Elza works closely with their internal Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council as they implement a number of initiatives designed to create positive change across the business.

    The Big Picture

    Posted 21 June 2017.

    ​By David Thomason, FCB.

    ​Advertising, marketing, communications (whatever you choose to call what we do) has become very messy. Our industry’s been accused of not changing fast enough and, at the same time, chasing shiny new and unproven trends. We’ve worried about traditional versus digital media. And generalists versus specialists. We’ve argued about the best way to interact with clients and partners, and which structure will efficiently produce the most effective work.

    They’re fascinating debates and they’ll keep raging. Competition keeps us evolving and improving, and there’ll never be one right answer for all. But there are important areas where we must align.

    Firstly, we need to reinforce the immense value marketing adds to business and other organisations. The recent Deloitte Advertising Pays study, commissioned by the Commercial Communications Council (previously CAANZ) also reveals the vast contribution the industry makes to the general economy.

    Secondly, we need to ensure we continue to deliver maximum value. This involves an important reality check; a kind of confession. It’s time to acknowledge that the strategic value of marketing and advertising has been weakened by an over-emphasis on short-term results.

    Numerous studies show that those who don’t reinvent their strategy every quarter, or throw away their campaign when it’s just getting traction, still win the bigger game. And that a modern impatience has made advertising less effective.

    It’s not one or the other. It’s all about balance. Short-term activation is critical to most businesses. But we need to acknowledge that consistent brand-building, and consistent executional elements, remain the more efficient and effective way to deliver results year after year.

    It’s our job to give clients expert advice even when it challenges their views. And to provide them with the evidence and support they need to achieve the best balance for their business and culture.

    But too often agencies have been willing accomplices. When presented with next year’s budget, the opportunity to develop exciting new strategy and creative ideas can be very tempting. It requires a maturity to say, “You know what? Your core strategy shouldn’t change. We created that brand campaign to last, so let’s keep running it.”

    Instead, we’ve allowed the balance to swing wildly towards small, short-lived ideas, campaigns and effects, and away from the most valuable aspect of what we do. We still have the power to develop strategies, ideas, innovations, campaigns, platforms and touch-points that deliver large and sustained effects. In a fragmented tech-driven world this only becomes more important.

    I’ve always believed that popularity is a very good indicator of brand campaign effectiveness (actually, this is supported by science), so it’s interesting to note that Colmar Brunton’s recent ‘TVC Top Ten’ includes nine “golden oldies”. Agencies talk a lot about ‘wear-out’ but in a fragmented media world it makes sense that this now takes even longer. It’s often true that when you’re getting sick of your own campaign, it’s just starting to work.

    Someone will accuse me of being television-centric (and I haven’t got room to defend a bias here), but the importance of longevity applies at least as well in digital media. Mitre 10’s “Easy As”, the Electricity Authority’s “What’s My Number”, HPA’s Depression.org (“The Journal”) and New Zealand Fire Service’s “Escape My House” are all online platforms that were built to last – in fact they have, or will, last well beyond any specific advertising execution.

    This isn’t a digital technology issue. We need to shift the balance of our work across all channels. The Comms Council is helping to drive this agenda on behalf of the industry, and the Effie (Advertising Effectiveness) Awards provides an ideal opportunity to reinforce the point.

    This year brings one particularly significant change: the judging and marking process will now clearly favour campaigns that deliver lasting results, over those that produce a brief spike in audience response.

    This doesn’t mean short-term campaigns aren’t important or can’t win. But it will shift the balance. The Effies are an annual opportunity to review what really works in marketing and advertising today. Let’s make sure we’re all looking at the big picture.

    Meet the 2017 Effies Steering Committee and Convenor

    Posted 20 June 2017.

    CONVENOR

    Rupert Price, DDB

    Rupert’s career in advertising spans nearly eighteen years in London’s most pre-eminent agencies and now nearly six years in New Zealand. In the UK, Rupert worked on brand and advertising strategy with Y&R, AMV BBDO, JWT, Saatchi & Saatchi and Ogilvy. Beginning with local projects for companies including Kellogg’s, Unilever, The Army and Sainsbury’s, Rupert broadened his skill set to take on global strategic roles for BP, SAB Miller, Unilever and American Express amongst others. In 2010, Rupert relocated with his young family to New Zealand.

    Now working with DDB and Interbrand, Rupert has delivered strategic projects for Westpac, Lion, The Warehouse and Auckland Council. Rupert has won numerous IPA Effectiveness Awards, Effies and APG Awards and has been involved in highly awarded advertising campaigns including Persil ‘Dirt is Good’ and Dove ‘Campaign for Real Beauty’.

    Rupert also once won a trip for two to New York in an Elvis impersonation contest…

    ​STEERING COMMITTEE

    David McIndoe, Saatchi & Saatchi

    David rejoined Saatchi & Saatchi at the beginning of 2016 as the Head of Strategy. From his early days studying Economics and Psychology he started his career in market research focusing on strategic projects for Diageo and HP globally. Since joining the creative industry in 2004, David has led the strategic charge on many of New Zealand’s top brands, from banking to beer and almost everything in-between. Throughout his career, David has collected over 25 Effies including 9 Golds and a coveted Cannes Black Lion for Effectiveness.

    Jacqueline Smart, J. Walter Thompson

    Jacqueline represents the voice of the consumer inside JWT, Jacqueline has dedicated her academic and work life to understanding people, culture and the relationships people develop with brands and their communications. She delivers creative thinking grounded in market data and customer research, enabling brands to move into new, differentiated and productive waters. With a strong background in research, communications planning and traditional brand planning, Jacqueline has provided insights and strategy that have informed some of NZ’s most effective and enduring campaigns. Jacs only listens to Base FM or BFM and heads to the ocean whenever she can.

    Mylene Ong, Colenso BBDO

    Lured from the Head of Strategy role at BBH Shanghai, her appointment completes a revitalization of the strategic planning offering at College Hill that has seen the team grow to a dozen planners with a diverse skillset that spans today’s strategic requirements of a creative agency.

    A native of Singapore, Mylene has nearly 20 years of experience at some of the world’s top agencies including BBH Shanghai, JWT New York and M&C Saatchi Singapore and has directed strategy for major brands including IKEA, Audi, Smirnoff and Coca Cola.

    Mylene hopes to create a sitcom that is based on her imperfectly perfect family life. The ways of navigating the social and cultural constructs around an interracial marriage, the challenge of extracting clarity in a cacophony of accents and the eccentric imagination required to raise a third culture kid.

    David Thomason, FCB

    DT started out his career in creative, rising to Creative Director before switching gears and becoming a planner/strategist for the last 17 of his 30-year career.

    He’s has been at FCB for ten years, where he led the Planning team for the first nine, and has been instrumental in driving the agency’s own brand and high profile ‘Behaviour Change’ approach. In that time the agency has enjoyed a spectacular run of business growth and effectiveness accolades across all disciplines.

    DT has been Chairman of the CAANZ Effie Awards twice, and regularly lectures on Behavioural Economics, Cultural Identity and Social Change at AUT and Auckland University.

    At the beginning of 2016, DT’s role evolved from to Chief Strategist, allowing him to focus primarily on the bigger brand projects as well as FCB I.P, culture, training and ways of working.

    Outside of work he loves anything involving his fleet of four bicycles; road, mountain, city and electric.

    Individual Marketer of the Year - Effie Awards 2017 in association with TVNZ

    Posted 15 June 2017.

    ​Download the entry form

    Entry deadline extended to Tuesday 29th August

    ​This award recognises the role that an individual marketer plays in the development of effective work across a year. Judges will be looking for a marketing client who has lead their agencies in the marketing of a brand which has clearly excelled not only in the last 12 months, but who are setting their brand up for the long term. Judges seek evidence of a compelling brand story that inspires and motivates employees and partners, and is evident in all of the brand’s touchpoints.

    Judges will be looking for marketers who inspire their agency, who challenge them whilst giving them the freedom to succeed, and whose business results were the outcomes of genuine collaboration and friendship.

    This is an award for a client that is great to work with and gets great results out of their agencies. It’s therefore about more than a single campaign. The marketer of the year should be an inspirational figure to other marketers, who can represent marketing to the wider business community.

    Download the entry form here.

    Entry is open until August 29th at 4pm. Your nomination entry form should be submitted to Natasha Galloway on natasha@commscouncil.nz.

    Cost to enter is $400 + GST. $800 + GST for non-members.

    Brand, bricks and mortar mortality wildly inflated

    Posted 7 June 2017.

    ​By Ben Goodale, Managing Director, justONE

    ​The fuss over Amazon’s recent announcement that it is gearing up to enter the Australian market in September may have had a few Kiwis scratching their heads, and pondering what this means for local retailers. The news sparked a lot of media commentary and debate about the alleged ‘death of retail’ and for some, the ‘death of brands’, thanks to Amazon. That’s right, apparently we’re all going to start buying Amazon-branded toothpaste, washing powder and TVs because they will be conveniently and cost-effectively shipped to us by the benign retailer, and because going to the shops is apparently such a dreadful chore.

    This of course is utter nonsense, for a number of reasons. Firstly, shopping is well established by retail psychological experts as not simply about the act of shopping. In ‘Why We Buy’, revolutionary retail guru Paco Underhill , famously wrote: “We use shopping as therapy, reward, bribery, pastime, as an excuse to get out of the house, as a way to troll for potential loved ones, as entertainment, as a form of education or even worship, as a way to kill time”. And make no mistake – we Kiwis love to shop. It’s easy to get out to the shops here, with good roads and relatively convenient parking.

    Secondly, it assumes that brands will just lamely sit still and allow their market share to be massively eroded by commoditisation. It hasn’t really happened with own brands in major grocery and general retail, and there is no real evidence to suggest that Amazon can achieve what so many others haven’t. As the leader of an agency that is plugged into the views and strategies of several major corporates, I can say with confidence and conviction that big brand owners just won’t sit still.

    Thirdly, it assumes that Amazon possesses all the key cards and that somehow you can only buy directly from them. The whole omnichannel buzz of the last few years has made it abundantly clear that savvy retailers must offer several ways to serve, and deliver, to the customer. Engagement online, in-store, click and collect, delivery, and via online help tools – all of these critical elements are driving an evolution (it’s frankly too slow in New Zealand to call it a revolution) in how you can buy. I would argue, however, that one of the most crucial requirements is the in-store experience (which, in most cases, is getting better and better) to help differentiate from the convenience of an online experience. In my view, and as all the prevailing research indicates, the majority of people still want to touch and try before they purchase.

    Finally, there are no set rules about who is going to win the future of retailing. What we are currently seeing in New Zealand is that retailers here are taking proactive steps to protect their customer base, and therefore develop a much greater insight into what motivates people to purchase the things they need and want.

    The recent ‘loyalty wars’ are a perfect example of this. With the tussle of Fly Buys, Air New Zealand and Smartfuel, as well as several major retailer schemes such as New World Clubcard and Farmers Club, we’re seeing evidence of a play to develop much stronger relationships with, and understanding of, shoppers. This, in turn, means that the retailers involved are now able to serve their customers’ needs, irrespective of how they want to shop.

    On a personal level, I take some solace that until Amazon can work out how to properly segment and target me with recommendations on the sort of relevant books and music that I want to buy, there remains a reasonable window of opportunity for Kiwi brand owners and retailers to prepare themselves properly for the new zeitgeist. After shopping with Amazon for more than 20-years they still seem to have a very rudimentary insight into my purchasing preferences. And frankly, I’m a lot less complicated than delivering a toaster by drone to an address in the Wairarapa.

    BOTAB 2017: Battle of the Decades - Band Registrations Open Now

    Posted 6 June 2017.

    ​For full rules and to register, click here

    Fish and the Comms Council present the 10th annual Battle of the Ad Bands – Battle of the Decades.

    Whether you grew up listening to Dolly Parton, Frank Sinatra, or Lady Gaga, there’ll be something to shake your hips to.

    Each band will have 15 minutes to fill with songs from different decades.

    To claim the auspicious title of 2017 BOTAB champions, round up your agency’s best musos, register your band, and get practicing!

    You could be one of the last to grace the Kings Arms stage before it’s demolished. Make history. Register your band now.

    For those of you who have more moves like Jagger than musical talent, the battle takes place on Thursday 31st August. Tickets on sale mid-August.

    Theme: Battle of the Decades

    Date: Thursday 31st August, 6pm

    Venue: Kings Arms Tavern

    Website: www.botab.co.nz

    Are Your Influencers Really Influencing? - PREScom Speaker Series 2017

    Posted 6 June 2017.

    ​​The Commercial Communications Council PRESCOM Speaker Series 2017 invites you to explore:

    Beyond the hype of influencer marketing: risks, opportunities, and best-practice to ensure effectiveness.

    Purchase tickets

    ​Hear from local and international industry experts who will discuss how influencer marketing is evolving, including increasing pressure for greater transparency, what best-practice looks like, and the role of data to gain insights to measure real influence effectively.

    Damien Venuto, editor at StopPress and NZ Marketing Magazine, will facilitate an interactive panel discussion with panellists including:

    • Makaia Carr, Lifestyle Blogger, Entrepreneur, Public Speaker, Presenter
    • Tom Hutley, Head of Social, OMD Word at OMD Australia
    • Simon Kenny, Head of Communications at McDonald’s Restaurants (NZ) Ltd
    • Cat McNaughtan, Strategy Director at OMD New Zealand
    • Tina Moore, Head of Social Media at NZME.

    WE WILL EXPLORE

    • What makes an influencer credible – the importance of trust, authenticity and transparency
    • Everyday influencers vs celeb influencers – the difference between engagement and influence and where the opportunities exist for marketers
    • How data determines the success of a campaign
    • Compliance legal issues – what’s happening in Australia post the release of The Australian Association of National Advertisers best-practice guidelines for Influencers?

    Date:

    Wednesday 28th June 4.30pm drinks & treats at Vikki Lane adjacent to NZME.

    Then we will move to the iHeart Lounge at NZME. for a 5.30pm start.

    Venue:

    NZME. 2 Graham Street, Auckland 1010.


    Normal Comms Council terms of trade apply.

    Comms Council gratefully acknowledges NZME. for its support.

    Cost:

    Members - $100 + GST pp

    Non-members - $155 + GST pp

    Parking:

    Paid street parking in Hardinge and Graham Street.

    Auckland Council Parking – Fanshawe Street & Wilson Carpark Victoria Street.

    Please advise any special dietary requirements.

    BOOK NOW

    Additional fees may apply.

    Advertising Pays - a report by Deloitte Access Economics

    Posted 25 May 2017.

    ‘Advertising Pays’ quantifies the economic, employment and business value of advertising in New Zealand for the first time.

    • Advertising is a significant driver of economic growth contributing around $6 billion or 2.4% of GDP a year
    • Paid advertising expenditure was $2.4 billion in 2015 almost 1% of GDP, total expenditure is likely over $3 billion
    • More than 44,000 New Zealand jobs are associated with advertising, including 12,000 directly employed in the advertising industry

    ​Today’s launch of a report by Deloitte Access Economics for the Commercial Communications Council is the first time an econometric analysis of advertising’s monetary value has been undertaken in New Zealand.

    Advertising contributes 2.4% to the country’s GDP a year, about half what international tourists spend here in the same period.

    Advertising contributes $6 billion to the economy through a range of sectors including: Retail - $816m; Leisure & Entertainment – $588m; Food - $566m, Automotive - $526m and Government departments, services & community - $383m.

    The Deloitte report found paid advertising expenditure was $2.4 billion in 2015, almost 1% of GDP. Total expenditure, taking into account revenue from the production of content, was over $3 billion.

    Commercial Communications Council CEO Paul Head says the report is ground-breaking, proving the very significant contribution the industry makes to the NZ economy over and above what is actually spent on advertising.

    “While the industry has lots of case studies about the effectiveness of individual advertising campaigns, this is the first time we have been able to quantify the importance of the advertising industry to the NZ economy at a macroeconomic level.

    “The report proves that advertising is a key driver of economic growth and employment and contributes significantly to the growth and profitability of a wide range of industry sectors. As the title of the report says, Advertising Pays,” says Paul.

    Advertising adds value through income generation and job creation with 44,000 people employed directly or in associated sectors.

    • Direct employment in advertising; 12,412 (core and support advertising occupations)
    • Indirect employment in advertising; 5,341 (supply chain including design, print, photography, travel, HR, legal)
    • Media; 17,575 (newspaper/magazine publishing, TV, cinema, radio)
    • Content creation; 8,846 (motion picture/video production and distribution, sports administration, sports people, music and sound recording, software publishing)

    In addition to business benefits, advertising is an established and proven influencer of audience behaviour in areas such as road safety, public health and tourism. The report highlights that the ‘Legend’ drink driving campaign, commissioned by The NZ Transport Agency, is estimated to have saved 64 young driver lives over three years, saving the country $290 million.*

    Deloitte Access Economics’ partner and report co-author John O’Mahony says the report is significant in that it highlights the value of the advertising industry to the New Zealand economy and proves the tangible business benefits advertising delivers.

    “The report finds that award winning advertisements in New Zealand have delivered $17 in sales for every $1 spent on the campaign.

    “Beyond the direct benefits to business, advertising also delivers a broader economic benefit, because it fuels competition, which drives innovation, quality service and lower prices for consumers,” says John.

    Advertising Pays is being launched at an event tonight featuring keynote speaker Sir John Kirwan speaking about his role as a mental health ambassador and the positive impact advertising has made to mental health awareness.

    Download the report

    *This figure relies on the assumption made by the Ministry of Transport that the cost of a single life in a drink driving crash is $4.54 million.

    Advertising Pays - Deloitte Access Economics Report

    Posted 24 May 2017.

    ​New Zealand spends billions on paid advertising every year – over $3 billion in 2015. But what impact does this investment have on economic growth, employment, social change and innovation? It’s all in Advertising Pays - the comprehensive report by Deloitte Access Economics.

    Key findings:

    Advertising contributes $6bn to the New Zealand economy. That’s 2.4% of GDP and equivalent to six months spending by international tourists.

    Over 44,000 New Zealand jobs are associated with advertising. Advertising employs 12000 people in New Zealand with another 32000 employed in the advertising supply chain or industries supported by the industry.

    Advertising builds business success. It drives sales and builds brands. By involving an advertising agency at the corporate strategy level business can maximise the potential of not just advertising but broader business objective.

    Creative advertising works harder. Successful campaigns can return $17 for every dollar spent.

    And in New Zealand we are globally recognised for our creativity. New Zealand creative work performs highly in global awards and the 2015 Cannes Lions Global Creativity Report ranked Auckland as the 4th most creative city in the world; ahead of Sydney, Tokyo and Bangkok.

    Advertising drives social change. By helping government connect with the public, advertising can deliver positive behavioural change. The NZTA ‘Legend’ drink drive campaign is estimated to have saved 64 lives over the 3 year campaign. A $3.6m spend that delivered a $290m cost saving for society.

    It’s all in Advertising Pays. Take a look.

    Download the report.